Gentle Flame: The Life and Verse of Dudley, Fourth Lord North (1602-1677)

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Duke University Press, 1983 - Poetry - 254 pages
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Gentle Flame recounts the life and presents for the first time the hitherto unknown poetry of Dudley, Fourth Lord North. Born during the reign of Elizabeth I, reared in that of James I, elected to Parliament under Charles I, and retired to his country seat during the time of Charles II, the life an poetry of the Fourth Lord North deepens present-day understanding of an age that saw much social change.
 

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Page 201 - And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand ; and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, king of the Jews ! And they spit upon him, and took the reed, and smote him on the head.
Page 202 - And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven, as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire ; and it sat upon each of them, and they were all filled with the Holy Ghost ; and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.
Page 201 - And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe. And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail king of the Jews!
Page 34 - There is both in the inns of court and the inns of chancery a sort of academy, or gymnasium, fit for persons of their station, where they learn singing and all kinds of music, dancing, and such other accomplishments and diversions (which are called revels) as are suitable to their quality, and such as are usually practised at court.
Page 197 - Character of a Happy Life HOW happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill ! Whose passions not his masters are; Whose soul is still prepared for death, Untied unto the world by care Of public fame or private breath; Who envies none that chance doth raise...
Page 197 - I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please ; for so fools have : And they that are most galled with my folly, They most must laugh: And why, sir, must they so) The why...
Page 33 - But the main thing which made me even weary of the College was, that swearing, drinking, rioting, and hatred of all piety and virtue under false and adulterate names, did abound there and generally in all the University.
Page 228 - Ephemeris Parliamentaria; or a faithfull register of the transactions in Parliament, in the third and fourth years of the reign of our late Sovereign Lord King Charles: containing the severall speeches, cases, and arguments of law transacted between his Majesty and both Houses.
Page 174 - Spirit is a most subtile vapour, which is expressed from the blood, and the instrument of the soul, to perform all his actions ; a common tye or medium betwixt the body and the soul, as some will have it ; or (as ' Paracelsus) a fourth soul of itself.
Page 110 - Tis ridiculous for a lord to print verses ; 'tis well enough to make them to please himself, but to make them public is foolish.

About the author (1983)

Randall is Professor of English at Duke University.

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