Geography, Science and National Identity: Scotland Since 1520

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 4, 2001 - History - 310 pages
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Charles Withers' book brings together work on the history of geography and the history of science with extensive archival analysis to explore how geographical knowledge has been used to shape an understanding of the nation. Using Scotland as an exemplar, the author places geographical knowledge in its wider intellectual context to afford insights into perspectives of empire, national identity and the geographies of science. In so doing, he advances a new area of geographical enquiry, the historical geography of geographical knowledge, and demonstrates how and why different forms of geographical knowledge have been used in the past to constitute national identity, and where those forms were constructed and received. The book will make an important contribution to the study of nationhood and empire and will therefore interest historians, as well as students of historical geography and historians of science. It is theoretically engaging, empirically rich and beautifully illustrated.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
3
III
13
IV
24
V
30
VI
31
VII
40
VIII
52
XX
142
XXI
158
XXII
160
XXIII
172
XXIV
182
XXV
195
XXVI
198
XXVII
210

IX
56
X
61
XI
69
XII
70
XIII
84
XIV
96
XV
104
XVI
112
XVII
114
XVIII
119
XIX
134
XXVIII
225
XXIX
236
XXX
240
XXXI
245
XXXII
251
XXXIII
254
XXXIV
256
XXXV
263
XXXVI
303
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About the author (2001)

Charles W. J. Withers is Professor of Historical Geography at the University of Edinburgh. His publications include Geography and Enlightenment (1999), co-edited with David Livingstone.

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