Geography and vision: seeing, imagining and representing the world

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I.B. Tauris, May 15, 2008 - History - 256 pages
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Geography and Vision is a series of personal reflections by leading cultural geographer, Denis Cosgrove, on the complex connections between seeing, imagining and representing the world geographically.  Ranging historically from the sixteenth century to the present day, the essays include reflections upon discovery and the role of imagination in giving it meaning; colonisation and sixteenth century gardening; the shaping of American landscapes; wilderness, imperial mappings and masculinity; urban cartography and utopian visions; conceptions of the Pacific; the cartography of John Ruskin; and the imaginative grip of the Equator. Extensively illustrated, this engaging work reveals the richness and complexity of the geographical imagination as expressed over the past five centuries.

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Geography and vision
Extraterrestrial geography
Gardening the Renaissance world

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About the author (2008)

The late Denis Cosgrove was Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Geography at the University of California Los Angeles. A founding editor of the journal Ecumene (now Cultural Geographies ), his previous books include The Palladian Landscape (1993), Social Formations and Symbolic Landscape (2nd edn 1998), Mappings (editor, 1999) and Apollo's Eye (2001), which won the Association of American Publishers Professional and Scholarly Publishing Award in Geography & Earth Sciences.  He is co-editor, with Veronica della Dora, of High Places: Cultural Geographies of Mountains, Ice and Science (I.B.Tauris, forthcoming). 

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