Geological Survey Water-supply Paper, Issues 1067-1070

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950 - Irrigation
 

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Page 71 - ... ultimately with the salt water of the sea. Such movements have long been a matter of common knowledge. Even on small porous, sandy islands fresh water can generally be found at an altitude slightly above mean sea level. It might be supposed that in such places the salt water surrounding the island would penetrate the sand to mean sea level and immediately absorb all the fresh water that might percolate downward to its surface. For several physical reasons this does not happen. Such islands are...
Page 10 - Among the most common chemical substances found in ground water are silica (SiO2), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), carbonate (CO3), bicarbonate (HCO3), sulfate (SO4), chloride (Cl), fluoride (F) and nitrate (NO3).
Page 364 - It was made under the general direction of OE Meinzer, Geologist in charge of the Division of Ground Water in the United States Geological Survey, and Robert H.
Page 12 - Hardness in water is normally produced by calcium and magnesium; it may be recognized by the increased quantity of soap required to produce lather and by the deposits of insoluble salts formed when the water is heated or evaporated. Water having a hardness, as calcium carbonate, of less than about 60 parts per million is considered soft.
Page 87 - ... used for the reason that for certain fields it is the only water available. Although most people can detect the presence of salt when the chloride content exceeds 200 parts per million, water containing considerably higher quantities of chloride can be consumed by human beings without harmful effect. People who are accustomed to drinking water containing as high as 350 parts per million of chloride have stated that they prefer their own water to that of the Honolulu municipal supply (chloride...
Page 88 - ... excessive chloride content of water has a bad effect on sugar cane, the amount that it will tolerate varies with the type of soil, the terrane, and the quantity of water applied to the fields. Several plantation officials have mentioned figures ranging from 700 to 900 parts per million of chlorides as the maximum permissible without impairing the yield of sugar. On one plantation it was found that best results were obtained when the water discharged from a group of wells containing as high as...
Page 88 - ... the artesian water on this island, have developed supplies that, although locally somewhat brackish, are entirely satisfactory for irrigation. Very little of the developed ground water contains more than 1,000 parts per million of chlorides, and most of it contains less than 300 parts per million. Although excessive chloride content of water has a bad effect on sugar cane, the amount that it will tolerate varies with the type of soil, the terrane, and the quantity of water applied to the fields....
Page 45 - Introduction and review of the literature on the geology of the Virgin Islands : New York Acad. Sci., Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands, vol. 4, pt. 1, pp.
Page 45 - Ollgocene and Miocene: St. Croix, Virgin Islands. JF Kemp, 1926, New York Acad. Sci. Scientific Survey of Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands, v. 4, pt. 1, .p. 49 (reprinted? from JF Kemp, 1923, Report to HH Hough, Captain, USN, Governor. Virgin Islands.
Page 16 - ... geology of Kiowa County. In 1938 and 1939 Waite (1942) made a detailed study of the geology and groundwater resources of Ford County, which borders Kiowa County on the west. A similar study was made by Frank Byrne in Barber County in 1941, but as yet no report has been issued on this work. A report on water levels and artesian pressure in observation wells in the United States in 1940 includes a chapter on the observationwell program in Kiowa County (Meinzer and Wenzel, 1942, pp. 136137). Similar...

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