George Herbert: Verse and Prose

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SPCK, 2002 - Poetry - 118 pages
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When Wendy Cope developed an interest in poetry, she bought a selection of George Herbert's verse. She writes of his work: 'I took to it immediately. What especially appealed to me - and still does - was this poet's wonderfully playful delight in poetic form, and the fact that these playful poems are, at the same time, utterly serious...There is humour, as well as exuberant inventiveness, in his work, but no one challenges his standing as a seriuos poet, whose primary concern was not to show off but to tell the truth.' In George Herbert: Verse and Prose, Wendy Cope has brought together a fine selection of Herbert's poems and introduces us to a little of his prose and a few of his 'Outlandish Proverbs'. She has also provided an extended introduction to the work of this important seventeenth-century poet.

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Contents

The Windows
40
uThe Collar
78
The Flower
90
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

George Herbert, remembered as one of the greatest of the Metaphysical poets, was born on April 3, 1593 in Montgomery, Wales. He attended Trinity College, Cambridge. Herbert was a Fellow of Trinity, a public orator, the canon of Lincoln Cathedral and a rector in Bemerton. Herbert died on March 1, 1633. On his deathbed, he gave a manuscript of verses called The Temple to his friend, Nicolas Ferrar. Although Herbert wanted the manuscript burned, Ferrar had it published. The poems contained in the manuscript exalt God, but Herbert believed he was committing a sin of pride by creating an artistic work.

Cope is one of our best-known contemporary poets.

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