George Herbert and Henry Vaughan

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Oxford University Press, Jul 24, 1986 - Literary Criticism - 569 pages
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This volume presents the work of two poets linked by the tribute of creative imitation gratefully paid by Vaughan to Herbert. Read side by side, as this one volume collection makes possible, the artists' verse fully reveal their individual powers, even as the complex nature of Vaughan's use of Herbert's imaginative example is thrown into greater relief. The book contains the complete English poetry of Herbert, his prose treatise, The Country Parson, the complete text of Vaughan's Silex Scintillans, including all material in both the 1650 and 1655 editions, plus a selection from Vaughan's early secular poetry. Louis Martz's introduction and commentary help bring the religious controversies of the age into focus, and the text also features chronologies of the lives of the two men, and suggestions for further readings.

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Contents

THE TEMPLE Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculat1ons
3
The Church
22
Antiphon
45
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

George Herbert, remembered as one of the greatest of the Metaphysical poets, was born on April 3, 1593 in Montgomery, Wales. He attended Trinity College, Cambridge. Herbert was a Fellow of Trinity, a public orator, the canon of Lincoln Cathedral and a rector in Bemerton. Herbert died on March 1, 1633. On his deathbed, he gave a manuscript of verses called The Temple to his friend, Nicolas Ferrar. Although Herbert wanted the manuscript burned, Ferrar had it published. The poems contained in the manuscript exalt God, but Herbert believed he was committing a sin of pride by creating an artistic work.

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