George Passant

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House of Stratus, Oct 11, 2008 - Fiction - 328 pages
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In the first of the Strangers and Brothers series Lewis Eliot tells the story of George Passant, a Midland solicitor's managing clerk and idealist who tries to bring freedom to a group of people in the years 1925 to 1933. Ten other novels follow this one.
 

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Contents

Firelight on a Silver Cigarette Case
3
Conference at Night
12
View Over the Gardens
19
A Cup of Coffee Spilt in a DrawingRoom
23
Georges Attack
33
Results of a Celebration
43
Argument Under the Gaslight
52
George at the Centre of His Group
60
Sight of Old Friends
155
The First Inquiries
165
Conversations at Night
172
A Guilty Story
181
Conflict on Tactics
187
The TwentyNinth of December
193
Newspaper Under a Reading Lamp
198
Georges Diary
204

THE FIRM OF EDEN MARTINEAU
73
The Echo of a Quarrel
75
Roofs Seen from an Office Window
80
A Firm of Solicitors
86
Evening by the River
90
An Unnecessary Confession
96
The Last Friday Night
102
Martineaus Intention
108
Walk in the Rain
115
A Slip of the Tongue
121
I Appeal
127
George Calls on Morcom
132
Two Progresses
139
THE WARNING
143
News at Second Hand
145
Return from a Holiday
148
Confidential Talk in Edens DrawingRoom
225
Visit to George
231
THE TRIAL
235
Courtroom Lit by a Chandelier
237
Dinner Party After a Bad Day
248
The Park Revisited
255
Martineaus Day in Town
261
Night With the Passants
270
Impressions in the Court
276
The Last CrossExamination
283
Confession While Getliffe Prepares His Speech
294
Getliffes Speech
304
Fog Outside Bedroom Windows
310
The Last Day
317
Walk into the Town
324
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About the author (2008)

C.P. Snow was born in Leicester, on 15 October 1905. He was educated from age 11 at Alderman Newton's School for boys where he excelled in most subjects, enjoying a reputation for an astounding memory. In 1923, he gained an external scholarship in science at London University, whilst working as a laboratory assistant at Newton's to gain the necessary practical experience, because Leicester University, as it was to become, had no chemistry or physics departments at that time. Having achieved a first class degree, followed by a Master of Science he won a studentship in 1928 which he used to research at the famous Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. Snow went on to become a Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, in 1930 where he also served as a tutor, but his position became increasingly titular as he branched into other areas of activity. In 1934, he began to publish scientific articles in 'Nature', and then 'The Spectator' before becoming editor of the journal 'Discovery' in 1937. He was also writing fiction during this period and in 1940 'Strangers and Brothers' was published. This was the first of eleven novels in the series and was later renamed 'George Passant' when 'Strangers and Brothers' was used to denote the series itself. 'Discovery' became a casualty of the war, closing in 1940. However, by this time Snow was already involved with the Royal Society, who had organised a group to specifically use British scientific talent operating under the auspices of the Ministry of Labour. He served as the Ministry's technical director from 1940 to 1944. After the war, he became a civil service commissioner responsible for recruiting scientists to work for the government and also returned to writing, continuing the 'Strangers and Brothers' novels. 'The Light and the Dark' was published in 1947, followed by 'Time of Hope' in 1949, and perhaps the most famous and popular of them all, 'The Masters', in 1951. He planned to finish the cycle within five years, but the final novel 'Last Things' wasn't published until 1970. C.P. Snow married the novelist Pamela Hansford Johnson in 1950 and they had one son, Philip, in 1952. He was knighted in 1957 and became a life peer in 1964, taking the title Baron Snow of the City Leicester. He also joined Harold Wilson's first government as Parliamentary Secretary to the new Minister of Technology. When the department ceased to exist in 1966 he became a vociferous back-bencher in the House of Lords. After finishing the 'Strangers and Brothers' series, Snow continued writing both fiction and non-fiction. His last work of fiction was 'A Coat of Vanish', published in 1978. His non-fiction included a short life of Trollope published in 1974 and another, published posthumously in 1981, 'The Physicists: a Generation that Changed the World'. He was also inundated with lecturing requests and offers of honorary doctorates. In 1961, he became Rector of St. Andrews University and for ten years also wrote influential weekly reviews for the 'Financial Times'.

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