George Walker at Suez (Webster's Korean Thesaurus Edition)

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Icon Group International, Incorporated, Jan 2, 2009 - 30 pages
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This edition is written in English. However, there is a running Korean thesaurus at the bottom of each page for the more difficult English words highlighted in the text. There are many editions of George Walker at Suez. This edition would be useful if you would like to enrich your Korean-English vocabulary, whether for self-improvement or for preparation in advanced of college examinations. Websters edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to difficult, yet commonly used English words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in Korean, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English without using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having the reader decipher a words meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. This edition is helpful to Korean-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL or TOEIC preparation program. Students who are actively building their vocabularies in Korean or English may also find this useful for Advanced Placement (AP) tests. TOEFL, TOEIC, AP and Advanced Placement are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. This book is one of a series of Websters paperbacks that allows the reader to obtain more value from the experience of reading. Translationsare from Websters Online Dictionary, derived from a meta-analysis of public sources, cited on the site.

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About the author (2009)

Novelist Anthony Trollope was born in London, England on April 24, 1815. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there. In 1834, he became a junior clerk in the General Post Office, London. He spent seven years there in poverty until his transfer, in 1841, to Banagher, Ireland as a deputy postal surveyor. He became more financially secure and in 1844, he married Rose Heseltine. He wanted to discover the reasons for Irish discontent. In 1843, he began working on his first novel The Macdermots of Ballycloran which was published in 1847. He was sent on many postal missions. He spent a year is Belfast, in 1853, then went to Donnybrook, near Dublin. He also went to Egypt, Scotland and the West Indies to finally settle outside of London, at Waltham Cross, as a surveyor general in the Post Office. At this point, he was writing constantly. Some of the writings during this time were The Noble Jilt, Barchester Towers, and The Last Chronicle of Barset. In 1867, he tried editorship of St. Paul's Magazine but soon gave up because he didn't feel suited for the job. In 1871, he went on a visit to a son in Australia. At sea, he wrote Lady Anna on the voyage out and Australia and New Zealand on the voyage back. The Autobiography was written between October 1875 and April 1876 but was not published until after his death. Suffering from asthma and possible angina pectoris, he moved to Harting Grange. He wrote three more novels during 1881 than, in 1882, went to Ireland to begin research for The Landleaguers. In November that year, he suffered a paralytic stroke and he died on December 6, 1882.

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