George Washington Carver: Scientist and Symbol

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OUP USA, Jun 16, 1982 - Biography & Autobiography - 384 pages
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How did George Washington Carver, whose concrete accomplishments on paper did not amount to much more that "doing something" with peanuts, sweet potatoes, homemade paint and recipes, come to be known as a great man who made brilliant inventions? How was it that his more significant contributions were lost in the myth-making that surrounded him? The author addresses these questions and others as she joins biography with a sensitive exploration of Carver as a symbol of black ability and achievement and the rewards of tolerance, and demonstrates his immense impact at a difficult point in the history of American race relations. -- Back Cover.
 

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Contents

Wandering in Search of a Destiny
3
To Be of the Greatest Good
32
Trouble on the Tuskegee Plantation
52
The Need for Scientific Agriculture
71
The Process of Understanding Relationships
93
Making Education Common
112
Undeveloped Southern Resources
130
The Wizard of Tuskegee
145
Dawning of the New South
179
Breaking Down Barriers
197
The Peanut Man
219
Suffering Humanity
242
Man and Symbol
256
Blazing the Trail
290
Notes
315
Index
361

The End of an Era
159

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About the author (1982)

Linda O. McMurry is at North Carolina State University.

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