German American Annals, Volume 7; Volume 11

Front Cover
German American Historical Society, 1909 - Germans
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 255 - He remarked that there was no demand in the old country for all the professional men whom the universities were turning out, and that they must find a new and developing country where their services would be in demand. He glowingly described Texas as a land of milk and honey, of perennial flowers, of crystal streams rich and fruitful beyond measure, where roamed myriads of deer and buffalo, while the primeval forests abounds in wild fowl of every kind.
Page 249 - Communistic Colony of Bettina," better known as the "Colony of Forty" or the "Darmstaedter Kolonie." This colony soon disbanded, and in 1850 Schleicher settled in San Antonio. He became a student of the English and Spanish languages, and in 1853, was elected to the Texan House of Representatives. In 1859, he was elected as Senator from Bexar County, and served until 1861, when he entered the Confederate army as captain in the engineer corps, in which service he remained until the close of the war....
Page 260 - He seemed excitable and somewhat suspicious ; gave no tokens whatever of having studied any book but the Bible, and that only as it helped him to enforce his own philosophy. He was very quick to turn every thought toward the one subject of community life ; took his illustrations mostly from the New Testament; and evidently laid much stress on the parental character of God. As he discussed, his eyes lighted up with a somewhat fierce fire ; and I thought I could perceive a fanatic, certainly a person...
Page 209 - You have often observed that the continual clashing between natives and foreigners might easily come to a general eruption, which would result disastrously to the Germans, unless we consider in time the proverb that, 'He who desires peace should prepare for war.' "The Cincinnati April Scenes and those at Columbus, have shown that the police in such cases are not fully sufficient for our guard, or suppression of the mob. In such cases, we must depend upon ourselves to defend our families and property,...
Page 171 - ... incongruities and bizarre contrasts of the backwoods life of these settlers. You are welcomed by a figure in blue flannel shirt and pendant beard, quoting Tacitus, having in one hand a long pipe, in the other a butcher's knife; Madonnas upon...
Page 169 - I never in my life, except, perhaps," in awakening from a dream, met with such a sudden and complete transfer of associations. Instead of loose boarded or hewn log walls with crevices stuffed with rags or daubed with mortar, which we have been accustomed to see during the last month on staving in a door, where we have found any to open; instead, even, of four bare, cheerless sides of whitewashed plaster, which we have found twice or thrice only in a more aristocratic American residence, we were in...
Page 213 - But this is not all. If Texas should refuse to come into our Union, measures will instantly be taken to fill her territory with emigrants from Europe . Extensive arrangements for this are already made, and they will be carried into effect as soon as the decision of Texas shall be known.
Page 167 - The main street of the town, which we soon entered upon, was very wide — three times as wide, in effect, as Broadway in New York. The houses, with which it was thickly lined on each side for a mile, were small, low cottages, of no pretensions to elegance, yet generally looking neat and comfortable. Many were furnished with verandahs and gardens, and the greater part were either stuccoed or painted. There were many workshops of mechanics and small stores, with signs oftener in English than in German...
Page 114 - The first German settlers we saw, we knew at once. They lived in little log cabins, and had inclosures of ten acres of land about them. The cabins were very simple and cheap habitations, but there were many little conveniences about them and a care to secure comfort in small ways evident that was very agreeable to notice. So, also, the greater variety of the crops which had been grown upon their allotments, and the more clean and complete...

Bibliographic information