German Romance: Goethe, Wilhelm Meister's travels

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Page 139 - ... nature has in some degree restored itself to freedom and independence. The natural man repeats this operation millions of times in the course of his life; from fear he struggles to freedom; from freedom he is driven back to fear, and so makes no advancement. To fear is easy, but grievous ; to reverence is difficult, but satisfactory. Man does not willingly submit himself to reverence, or rather he never so submits himself : it is a higher sense which must be communicated to his nature ; which...
Page 148 - ... Jerusalem, and dispersed the people ; yet you have not introduced the divine Man who taught there shortly before ; to whom, shortly before, they would give no ear.' " ' To have done this, as you require it, would have been an error. The life of that divine Man, whom you allude to, stands in no connection with the general history of the world in his time. It was a private life, his teaching was a teaching for individuals. What has publicly befallen vast masses of people, and the minor parts which...
Page 220 - ... each other. The scholars were first instructed in each according to its own limitations; then taught how the two reciprocally limit, and again reciprocally free each other. To poetical rhythm the musical artist opposes measure of tone and movement of tone. But here the mastery of Music over Poesy soon shows itself; for if the latter, as is fit and necessary, keep her quantities never so steadily in view, still for the musician few syllables are decidedly short or long; at his pleasure he can...
Page 230 - As all Nature's thousand changes But one changeless God proclaim, So in Art's wide kingdoms ranges One sole meaning, still the same : This is Truth, eternal Reason, Which from Beauty takes its dress, And, serene through time and season, Stands for aye in loveliness.
Page 307 - ... with him, though Antoni himself introduced little fire into the subject. Julia, quite enraptured, was still nowise satisfied : she longed for Alexandria, Cairo, and above all, for the Pyramids; of which, by the lessons of her intended father-in-law, she had gained some moderate knowledge. Lucidor next night (he had scarcely shut his door ; the candle he had not put down) exclaimed : " Now, bethink thee, then : it is growing serious ! Thou hast studied and meditated many serious things : what...
Page 130 - Felix obeyed, but soon cried: 'This is not much to my taste; I see nothing up there: does it last long? But yes !' exclaimed he joyfully, 'yonder are a pair of falcons flying from the west to the east ; that is a good sign too 1' — ' As thou takest it, as thou behavest,' said the other : 'Now mingle among them as they mingle.
Page 265 - ... fallen asleep ; and on awakening I observed the glimmer of a light on the covering of my carriage. I examined this more strictly, and found that it was issuing from the Box ; in which there seemed to be a chink, as if it had been chapped by the warm and dry weather of summer, which was now come on.
Page 146 - God of Nations, it is not asked whether this is the best, the most excellent nation ; but whether it lasts, whether it has continued. The Israelitish people never was good for much, as its own leaders, judges, rulers, prophets, have...
Page 257 - After a night passed in waking or unrestfully dreaming, I rose early; inquired whether she had ordered horses ; and learning that she had not, I walked into the garden, saw her standing dressed at the window, and hastened up to her. Here, as she looked so fair, and fairer than ever, love, roguery and audacity all at once started into motion within me : I rushed towards her, and clasped her in my; arms. ' Angelic, irresistible being,
Page 238 - There is something magical at all times in perspectives. Were we not accustomed from youth to look through them, we should shudder and tremble every time we put them to our eyes. It is we who are looking, and it is not we ; a being it is whose organs are raised to a higher pitch, whose limitations are done away, who has become entitled to stretch forth into infinitude. " When, for example, we observe...

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