German Romance: Richter, J. P. F.: Army-chaplain Schmelzle's journey to Flätz. Life of Quintus Fixlein

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Page 264 - Eternity, if he does not view with philosophic reverence a woman, whose thread of life a secret, all-wondrous Hand is spinning to a second thread, and who veils within her the transition from Nothingness to Existence, from Eternity to time; — but still less can a man have any heart of flesh, if his soul, in presence of a woman, who, to an unknown, unseen being, is sacrificing more than we will sacrifice when it is seen and known, namely, her nights, her joys, often her life, does not bow lower,...
Page 115 - ... the title-page : on these we are now printing. My Book contains the Life of a Schoolmaster, extracted and compiled from various public and private documents. With this Biography, dear Friends, it is the purpose of the Author not so much to procure you a pleasure, as to teach you how to enjoy one. In truth, King Xerxes should have offered his prize-medals not for the invention of new pleasures, but for a good methodology and directory to use the old ones. Of ways for becoming happier (not happy)...
Page 301 - ... the street-door ; a library as a learned conversation, joy as a second, sorrow as a minute, life as a day; and three things as all in all; God, Creation, Virtue...
Page 151 - Mutes, who may be for casting the noose of strangulation round my neck, most particularly beg, that, before doing so on account of my Chapters being called Letter-boxes, they would have the goodness to look whose blame it was, and to think whether I could possibly help it, seeing the Quintus had divided his Biography into such Boxes himself: they have Christian bowels. But about his elder brother he put no saddening question to his mother : this poor boy a peculiar Fate had laid hold of, and with...
Page 249 - I am unspeakably happy, and would say much, and cannot — Ah, thou Dearest, we will live like angels, like children together ! Surely I will do all that is good to thee ; two years ago I had nothing, no nothing ; ah, it is through thee, best love, that I am happy. I call thee Thou, now, thou dear good soul...
Page 119 - Can he accomplish this, can he turn so softly from the path of poetical happiness into that of household happiness, — then is he little different from myself, who even now, though modesty might forbid me to disclose it — who even now, I say, amid the creation of this Letter, have been enabled to reflect, that when it is done, so also will the Roses and Elder-berries of pastry be done, which a sure hand is seething in butter for the Author of this Work. As I purpose appending to this Letter a...
Page 11 - Love, not of superficial distortion of natural forms, but of deep though playful sympathy with all forms of Nature. It springs not less from the heart than from the head ; its result is not laughter, but something far kindlier and better ; as it were, the balm which a generous spirit pours over the wounds of life, and which none but a generous spirit can give forth. Such humour is compatible with tenderest and sublimest feelings, or rather, it is incompatible with the want of them.
Page 7 - ... all the elements, in short, of a glorious intellect, but dashed together in such wild arrangement, that their order seems the very ideal of confusion. The style and structure of the book appear alike incomprehensible. The narrative is every now and then suspended to make way for some " Extra-leaf," some wild digression upon any subject but the one in hand; the language groans with indescribable metaphors and allusions to all things human and divine ; flowing onward, not like a river, but like...
Page 245 - ... fenceless little angular flower-garden; and here, composed and confident in the divine keeping, he pressed the stalks of his tulips deeper into the mellow earth. But on returning to the house, he was met on all hands by the bell-ringing and the...
Page 246 - However, about nine o'clock, when the marriage-guests had well nigh forgotten the marriage-pair, and were drinking or dancing along for their own behoof; when poor mortals, in this sunshine of Fate, like fishes in the sunshine of the sky, were leaping up from their wet cold element; and when the bridegroom under the star of happiness and love, casting like a comet its long train of radiance over all his heaven, had in secret pressed to his joy-filled breast his bride and his mother — then did he...

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