Getting Acquainted in Conversation: A Study of Initial Interactions

Front Cover
John Benjamins Publishing, Jan 1, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 383 pages
1 Review
What makes a 'getting acquainted' a recognizable conversational activity, and how are interpersonal relationships established in a first conversation? This book presents a theoretical framework for the study of relationship management in conversation and an empirical study of a corpus of initial interactions. It provides detailed descriptions of the sequential resources unacquainted interlocutors use in order to:
generate self-presentation
introduce topics
establish common contextual resources
It is argued that these sequential patterns embody conventionalized procedures for establishing an interpersonal relationship involving some degree of:
solidarity (mutual rights and obligations)
familiarity (mutual knowledge of personal background)
mutual affect (emotional commitment)
The sequential analysis is based on a conversation analytic approach, while the interpretive framework consists of pragmatic theories of politeness, conversational style and common ground.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTER 3
63
CHAPTER 4
91
CHAPTER 5
163
CHAPTER 6
257
CHAPTER 7
317
CHAPTER 8
333
Notes
357
Subject Index
377
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information