Getting Started in Interpreting Research: Methodological Reflections, Personal Accounts and Advice for Beginners

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Daniel Gile
John Benjamins Publishing, Jan 1, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 255 pages
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What sets this collection apart in the literature is its direct, personal style. Experienced supervisors as well as younger scholars speak to beginning researchers in interpreting, and more generally in Translation Studies. The contributors, who are very familiar with the difficulties beginners experience, focus on their needs and anticipate their questions. They reflect, analyze and advise, with illustrations from their own experience.
Issues discussed include topic selection, project planning, time management, 'doctoral stress', the use of the literature, critical reading and book reviews, supervisor-supervisee relations, institutional frameworks for research training, issues in empirical research, theoretical analysis, and the role of small projects. Readers will thus find answers to many personal, institutional and methodological questions, which are common to beginners in many disciplines and in many paradigms.
 

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Contents

Critical reading in interpretation research
23
Reporting on scientific texts
39
Problems
55
A supervisors account
69
Past present
87
Small projects in interpretation research
101
A supervisees perspective
121
A personal account
145
Reflections on data descriptions based
163
Approaching interpreting through discourse analysis
185
Working within a theoretical framework
199
Reflective summary of a dissertation on simultaneous interpreting
221
About the contributors
241
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