Getting Away with Murder: A Comedy Thriller

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Theatre Communications Group, 1997 - Drama - 123 pages
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Longtime musical theatre collaborators Stephen Sondheim and George Furth, who together created the landmark musical Company, have joined forces again to create a compellingly original thriller - Mr. Sondheim's first nonmusical play. Getting Away with Murder unfolds on a stormy night on Manhattan's Upper West Side at a group therapy session. The patients arrive only to find that their faithful, Pulitzer Prize-winning psychiatrist is missing. What unfolds is a classic whodunit in the tradition of Sleuth and The Mousetrap that harkens back to Sondheim's screenplay collaboration with Anthony Perkins on the cult film The Last of Sheila.

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User Review  - Unreachableshelf - LibraryThing

A clever little susspense play in which all of the characters are one of the seven deadly sins. It's not Great, but it deserves to be produced more often than it is. Stephen Sondheim's only non-musical. Read full review

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Section 1
2
Section 2
3
Section 3
5
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About the author (1997)

Stephen Sondheim was born in New York and studied music at Williams College, where he wrote the lyrics and music for two college shows. Sondheim also studied at Princeton University with Milton Babbit. He received recognition for writing lyrics for Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story (1957) and success as a lyricist-composer with A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962). However, his next musical, Anyone Can Whistle (1964), was unsuccessful. The production of Company (1970) again established Sondheim as a major composer and lyricist on Broadway. Sondheim's other productions include Follies (1971); A Little Night Music (1973), wherein its leading song, "Send in the Clowns," was awarded a Grammy in 1976; and Sunday in the Park with George (1983), a musical inspired by George Seurat's famous painting "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte." He has won him three Tony Awards, a Grammy Award, the New York Drama Critics Circle Best Musical Award, and the Pulitzer Prize.

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