Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving in, Issue 4

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Penguin Books, 1991 - Business & Economics - 200 pages
7 Reviews
Few of us are armed with the powerful negotiation skills that prevent stubborn haggling and ensure mutual problem-solving. This title presents a few easily remembered principles that will guide readers to success, no matter what the other side does or whatever dirty tricks they resort to. The Secret to Successful Negotiation Negotiation is a way of life for the majority of us. Whether we're at work, at home or simply going out, we want to participate in the decisions that affect us. Nowadays, hardly anyone gets through the day without a single negotiation, yet, few of us are armed with the effective, powerful negotiating skills that prevent stubborn haggling and ensure mutual problem-solving. Fisher and Ury cut through the jargon to present a few easily remembered principles that will guide you to success, no matter what the other side does or whatever dirty tricks they resort to. They include: - Don't bargain over positions - Separate people from the problem - Insist on objective criteria - What if they won't play?

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Easy & Quick Read

User Review  - emily1616 - Overstock.com

I initially ordered this book just because I needed to read it for a class but it turned out that besides being a quick and easy read its a rather useful read for anyone who negotiates and so that ... Read full review

Review: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

User Review  - JoDell - Goodreads

Douglas read this for a negotiations class he's taking right now, and asked that I read it to help improve "negotiations" in our marriage. I was impressed with the methods set out in this book--how to ... Read full review

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About the author (1991)

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor Emeritus of Law at Harvard, director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, and founder of two consulting organizations.
Daniel Shapiro, associate director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, teaches at Harvard Law School and in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School.

William Ury is the co-founder of Harvard's Program on Negotiation, where he directs the Project on Preventing War. One of the world's leading negotiation specialists, his past clients include dozens of Fortune 500 companies as well as the White House and Pentagon. Ury received his B.A. from Yale and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard. His books Getting to YES and Getting Past No have sold more than five million copies worldwide. He lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen teach at the Harvard Law School and the Harvard Negotiation Project, the group that produced the international bestseller "Getting to YES!" They have consulted to businesspeople, governments, organizations, communities, and individuals around the world, from the various parties to the negotiations on constitutional transition in South Africa to schoolteachers in Medellin, Colombia, to community leaders and the police department in Springfield, Massachusetts. They have written on negotiation and communications in publications ranging from "The New York Times" to "Parents" magazine. Bruce Patton is also coauthor of "Getting to YES!

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