Getting together: building a relationship that gets to yes

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin, 1988 - Business & Economics - 216 pages
0 Reviews
The authors of Getting to Yes examine all kinds of relationships, from a simple understanding between two people to the weighty relationship between superpowers, and note that none of these is routine or easy. They offer points supporting vigilance and strategy.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Having what we need to get what
7
Think separately about the relationship as a process
16
dont forget how differently people
25
Dont rely on reciprocity to build a relationship by expecting others
31
Requirements of a successful strategy
36
Rational decisionmaking requires a balance
44
We cant solve differences without understanding them
65
THREE BARRIERS TO EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
86
Base trust on risk analysis not moral judgment
125
The way people negotiate can wreck a relationship
133
Negotiators often use coercive tactics
136
Focus on positions vs Explore interests
143
Rejection creates physical obstacles to problemsolving
149
But what if
160
Applying the theory to practice
168
Be congruent with the particular relationship and situation
174

THREE WAYS TO STRENGTHEN THE RELATIONSHIP
92
They may have reason to mistrust us
109
Help them perceive our conduct as trustworthy
115
Do we encourage their unreliable conduct?
117
Pay more attention to the more important
186
An eye for an eye 33
213
Copyright

Other editions - View all

About the author (1988)

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor Emeritus of Law at Harvard, director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, and founder of two consulting organizations.
Daniel Shapiro, associate director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, teaches at Harvard Law School and in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School.

Bibliographic information