Ghost Towns Alive: Trips to New Mexico's Past

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UNM Press, 2003 - Travel - 256 pages

The first book of the twenty-first century on New Mexico's ghost towns, this illustrated survey is based on research, interviews, and the travels of author Linda Harris and photographer Pamela Porter. They have divided the state into eleven regions comprising seventy ghost towns, from the Santa Fe Trail and Colfax County in the north to the southern mountains and the boot heel at the other end of New Mexico.

For this writing, Harris has redefined ghost town to refer not just to permanently abandoned places but also to those that have declined without necessarily dying. She sheds light on the ways some towns have survived and how some have reinvented themselves, like Madrid and Cerrillos, former mining towns turned artistic and bohemian enclaves.

All the towns in this book are accessible. Many have their own web sites and most have benefited from the efforts of preservation-minded residents and museum curators. Roads have been improved, churches restored, and schools have been transformed into community centers, libraries, or residences. Ghost Towns Alive will certainly entice New Mexicans and out-of-state tourists alike to pack a lunch and hit the road. Don't forget to bring walking shoes and your camera!

 

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Review: Ghost Towns Alive

User Review  - Patrick Gibson - Goodreads

Damn it! I just realized I have ANOTHER book on ghost towns, after listing two others (one of which is great). Well, this one is easier to talk about because it really isn't (though it is) a guide per ... Read full review

Contents

From Turquoise to Tourists
1
Traders Soldiers and Settlers
18
Land Grant Legacy
39
Village Life
72
Highways
102
Billy the
115
When Silver
139
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Linda G. Harris, a Las Cruces resident, has been traveling and writing about New Mexico for twenty-five years. Her books on water resources, architecture, libraries, and history have won several awards, including the Southwest Book Award and the Zia Book Award.

Pamela Porter is a professional photographer whose work has been featured in New Mexico Magazine. She resides in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

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