Giambologna: Narrator of the Catholic Reformation

Front Cover
University of California Press, Jan 1, 1995 - Art - 262 pages
Arguably the pre-eminent European sculptor of his age, but historically considered little more than the facile court sculptor to the grand dukes of Florence, Giambologna played a major role in the artistic transformations of the late sixteenth century. Mary Weitzel Gibbons seeks to broaden our hitherto limited view of Giambologna's work by considering his neglected Genoese masterpiece, the Grimaldi Chapel. Although the chapel itself was destroyed during the Napoleonic period, its dazzling bronzes of Virtues and angel-putti and a Passion cycle in relief have survived. The fine detail and rich color of the bronzes are featured in color plates and black-and-white images photographed especially for this book.

Gibbons reassesses Giambologna's work, clearly defining his relation to the narrative tradition and his role as an artist of the Catholic Reformation. Her new insights into the artist's work will appeal to all those intrigued by this turbulent era in Western European history.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER 2
19
CHAPTER 3
40
FAITH GOOD WORKS
53
SALVATION
63
GIAMBOLOGNAS
87
Soccorso Chapel Contract and Addendum
166
APPENDIX 3
174
Notes
187
Selected Bibliography
222
Photographic Credits
243
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Mary Weitzel Gibbons is an independent scholar. She has taught at Vassar College and at City University of New York's Hunter and Baruch Colleges.

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