GIMMICKRY: In the Search for More Money [Whatever Works in the Scheme of Things]

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Xlibris Corporation, Apr 23, 2010 - History - 662 pages
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America’s direction is rabid deficit spending which moves the economy. Wealth aside, this business appears a no win since Congress mortgaged America for spending money. The reverse mortgage for seniors follows the same path. The senior is asked to sacrifice equity for spending money. The book traces a history of money in America, past and present. America today, like other countries in the global scheme of things, is a domesticated international. Great Britain ruled for two and a half centuries; pound sterling was the exchange, this during America’s emergence. There was a transfer of power after two World Wars. America and the Soviet Union took up the pace. The dollar exchange won out in 1989. In the New World Order, China, Asia, the European Union, Third World countries and terrorism emerged. International money discourages sovereignty and nationalism while at the same time sovereign public debt is being exploited. Public debt has weakened America. In the international scheme of things money knows no boundary and it has no flag.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE
9
CHAPTER TWO
16
CHAPTER THREE
57
CHAPTER FOUR
67
CHAPTER FIVE
111
CHAPTER SIX
123
CHAPTER SEVEN
128
CHAPTER EIGHT
166
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
306
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
367
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
415
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
467
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
500
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
515
CHAPTER NINETEEN
528
CHAPTER TWENTY
542

CHAPTER NINE
199
CHAPTER TEN
212
CHAPTER ELEVEN
239
CHAPTER TWELVE
275
Summary
569
Copyright
577
Contents
643
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

The writer, born in 1930, is a native of Baltimore, Maryland. A memorable moment was seeing the famous match race; Seabisquit beat War Admiral at Pimlico in 1938. He served in the United States Air Force during the Korean War, and was honorably discharged in 1954. The writer was married, the father of a son and daughter and a grandparent of two. As a registered civil engineer, he specialized in hydrology, storm water management, and land development design. Since retiring in 1995, the author has divided his time doing volunteer work, some travel, research at the Library of Congress and writing.

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