Ginn & Company's Classical Atlas: In Twenty Three Coloured Maps : with Complete Index

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Ginn & Company, 1897 - Classical geography - 66 pages
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Page cv - ... immense advantages of its position, fixed his residence here, in 330, in preference to Rome. The 7 hills on which it is built, ascend as they recede from the shore, and a beautiful green hill forms the back-ground. An arm of the Bosphorus affords it an excellent harbor, with an open navigation to the Black Sea on the north, and the Mediterranean on the south. The whole circuit of the city is about 12 miles. A wall from 14 to 20 feet high, flanked with towers, and having 6 gates, runs along the...
Page vii - With all these revisions, the semantic pitfalls have multiplied, and it may not be out of place to indicate a few of the more obvious ones. 'Peace efforts...
Page xx - ... would appear to be to aid the memory in recitation, the different parts each suggesting by association what was to follow. He naturally begins with the middle section, because it not only supplied the largest number of ships and men, and nearly all the greatest commanders, but also as it contained the seat of sovereignty and supplied the forces of the chief of the army. In making each district of territory lead him on to the next, he observes these two rules : He never passes over an intervening...
Page xx - ... as it contained the seat of sovereignty and supplied the forces of the chief of the army. In making each district of territory lead him on to the next, he observes these two rules : He never passes over an intervening territory, though he may cross a strait or a gulf. He throws the several States into curvilinear or other figures round the arc or along the line of which his recollection moves from point to point. The first section is divided into two figures — the one elliptical, the other...
Page xx - ... harmony with this picture, Thessaly was conspicuous throughout the historic times of Greece, for the excellence of its breeds of horses, and the high character of its cavalry. If all this be so, we cannot wonder at the high estimation in which the Catalogue of Homer was held by the Greeks of after-ages, as the great and only systematic record of the national claims of the respective states. This was not merely literary or private estimation : the Catalogue had the place of an authoritative public...

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