Girls, Women, and Crime: Selected Readings

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SAGE, 2004 - Social Science - 259 pages
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Edited by Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko, Girls, Women, and Crime: Selected Readings is a compilation of journal articles on the female offender written by leading researchers in the field of criminology and women's studies. The individual sections in the book survey four major areas: theories of female criminality, literature on female juvenile delinquents, women as offenders, and women in prison.

Girls, Women, and Crime can be used as a stand-alone text or as an excellent supplement to Meda Chesney-Lind and Lisa Pasko's The Female Offender, Second Edition (2003). This dynamic reader is recommended for academics, researchers, and students in sociology, women's studies, criminology, and criminal justice.

 

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Contents

GENDER AND CRIME A General Strain Theory Perspective
3
EXPLAINING GIRLS AND WOMENS CRIME AND DESISTANCE IN THE CONTEXT OF THEIR VICTIMIZATION EXPERIENCES A Develop...
24
DIFFERENT WAYS OF CONCEPTUALIZING SEXGENDER IN FEMINIST THEORY AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR CRIMINOLOGY
42
FEMINISM IN CRIMINOLOGY Engendering the Outlaw
61
FEMALE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS Experiences With Victimization Gang Involvement and the Justice System
75
OUTSIDEINSIDE The Violation of American Girls at Home on the Streets and in the Juvenile Justice System
77
THE GIRLS IN THE GANG What Weve Learned From Two Decades of Research
97
FEDERAL JUVENILE JUSTICE POLICY AND THE INCARCERATION OF GIRLS
115
WOMEN AT RISK IN SEX WORK Strategies for Survival
157
GENDER POWER AND ALTERNATIVE LIVING ARRANGEMENTS IN THE INNERCITY CRACK CULTURE
169
THE WAR ON DRUGS AS A WAR AGAINST BLACK WOMEN
185
WOMEN AND PRISON Before During and After Incarceration
195
WOMEN UNDER LOCK AND KEY A View From the Inside
197
REFLECTIONS ON WOMENS CRIME AND MOTHERS IN PRISON A Peacemaking Approach
210
LIVING ON THE OUTSIDE African American Women Before During and After Imprisonment
221
CHALLENGES INCARCERATED WOMEN FACE AS THEY RETURN TO THEIR COMMUNITIES Findings From Life History Interviews
231

GENDER BIAS AND JUVENILE JUSTICE REVISITED A Multiyear Analysis
128
THE WOMAN OFFENDER Crime and Punishment
145
MURDER AS SELFHELP Women and Intimate Partner Homicide
147
INDEX
247
ABOUT THE EDITORS
259
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About the author (2004)

Meda Chesney-Lind is Professor of Women’s Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Hawaii, and a B.A. Summa Cum Laude from Whitman College. She has served as Vice President of the American Society of Criminology and president of the Western Society of Criminology. Nationally recognized for her work on women and crime, her books include Girls, Delinquency and Juvenile Justice, The Female Offender: Girls, Women and Crime, Female Gangs in America, Invisible Punishment, Girls, Women and Crime, and Beyond Bad Girls: Gender Violence and Hype. She has just finished an edited collection on trends in girls’ violence, entitled Fighting for Girls: Critical Perspectives on Gender and Violence, published by SUNY Press. Dr. Chesney-Lind is a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology and the Western Society of Criminology. She has been on the Women’s Studies faculty at the University of Hawaii since 1986, and also serves on the graduate faculty in the Department of Sociology.She received the Bruce Smith, Sr. Award "for outstanding contributions to Criminal Justice" from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences in April, 2001. She was named a fellow of the American Society of Criminology in 1996 and has also received the Herbert Block Award for service to the society and the profession from the American Society of Criminology. She has also received the Donald Cressey Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for "outstanding contributions to the field of criminology," the Founders award of the Western Society of Criminology for "significant improvement of the quality of justice," and the University of Hawaii Board of Regent's Medal for "Excellence in Research."Chesney-Lind is an outspoken advocate for girls and women, particularly those who find their way into the criminal justice system. Her work on the problem of sexism in the treatment of girls in the juvenile justice system was partially responsible for the recent national attention devoted to services to girls in that system. More recently, she has worked hard to call attention to the soaring rate of women's imprisonment and the need to vigorously seek alternatives to women's incarceration.In Hawaii, Chesney-Lind has served as Principal Investigator of a long standing project on Hawaii's youth gang problem funded by the State of Hawaii Office of Youth Services. She has more recently also received funding to conduct research on the unique problems of girl's at risk of becoming delinquent from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Finally, she has also recently been tapped by the Hawaii Department of Public Safety to serve on an advisory panel on the problems of women in prison in Hawaii.

Lisa Pasko, Assistant Professor, received her PhD from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Lisa's primary research and teaching interests include criminology, punishment, sexualities/gender studies, as well as methodological issues in conducting studies of crime and deviance. Her dissertation examined juvenile delinquency and justice in Hawaii, with particular attention on the differential effects institutional policies and behaviors have on boys and girls. She is co-author of "The Female Offender" and other articles that explore issues of gender and delinquency. Dr. Pasko teaches courses on criminology, the female offender, men and masculinities, and crime and punishment. For the past ten years, she has been involved in criminal justice research. As project coordinator for the University of Hawaii Youth Gang Project, she evaluated numerous prevention and intervention programs for at-risk youth. Dr. Pasko has published in a variety of areas, including an ethnography of stripping, pathways predictors of juvenile justice involvement, a feminist analysis of restorative justice initiatives, and evaluations of two girl offender programs. Her current research is funded by the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice and examines the treatment of sexual minority girls in youth corrections.

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