Gleanings from the Sea: Showing the Pleasures, Pains and Penalties of Life Afloat with Contingencies Ashore

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The author, 1887 - Biddeford (Me.) - 399 pages
 

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Page 146 - Ye fish which in this liquid region 'bide, That for each season have your habitation, Now salt, now fresh where you think best to glide To unknown coasts to give a visitation, In lakes and ponds, you leave your numerous fry; So nature taught, and yet you know not why, You wat'ry folk that know not your felicity. Look how the wantons frisk to...
Page 147 - PSALM With vast amazement we survey The wonders of the deep, Where mackerel swim, and porpoise play, And crabs and lobsters creep. Fish of all kinds inhabit here, And throng the dark abode. Here haddock, hake, and flounders are, And eels, and perch and cod. From raging winds and tempests free, So smoothly as we pass, The shining surface seems to be A piece of Bristol glass.
Page 147 - But suddenly a storm spoils all the sport, And makes him long for a more quiet port, Which 'gainst all adverse winds may serve for fort. So he that saileth in this world of pleasure, Feeding on sweets that never bit of th...
Page 344 - ... oars of the boat and the oar of the steersman. The following description of the duties of the surfmen is taken from Captain Merryman's article already mentioned: — " Each day has its drill and exercise, and much spare time is devoted to keeping the building and apparatus in repair ; at night the duties become severe, and often perilous. The interval from sunset to sunrise is divided into three watches. At the beginning of each watch two men set out from the station on patrol duty, and follow...
Page 146 - To unknown coasts to give a visitation, In lakes and ponds, you leave your numerous fry; So nature taught, and yet you know not why, You wat'ry folk that know not your felicity.
Page 146 - The Mariner that on smooth waves doth glide, Sings merrily, and steers his barque with ease, As if he had command of wind and tide, And now become great Master of the seas ; But suddenly a storm...
Page 326 - ... on his return that he has faithfully performed his allotted task. The night is divided into four watches. The keeper is required to register in his log-book the name of each patrolman, his hours on patrol, the name of the patrolman from the next station whom he meets, the exact hour of meeting, and the direction and force of the wind at sunrise, noon, sunset, and midnight, together with the events of each day. This record is sent to the chief of the Service at Washington at the end of every week....
Page 63 - ... on sand and clay, but seldom, if ever, remains on muddy bottoms. Cod are most plenty in this locality from November to June, when they visit the shore for the purpose of spawning, during which time they usually remain in from 15 to 40 fathoms of water. 2. — CHARACTERISTICS OF THE COD. Cod-fish are gregarious in their habits, going in schools of greater or less size, and are governed in their movements by the presence or absence of food, the spawning instinct, and the temperature of the water....
Page 327 - Michigan — a large four -masted twin-screw steamer, with sixty-eight persons on board, thirtysix of whom were passengers. The wind and waves were smashing the steamer in pieces, and it was beginning to sink, when, after almost superhuman exertions, the hawser and hauling lines were connected with the foremast, and the life-car was sent out, with one of the life-saving crew to superintend operations. In an hour and a quarter every one on board was landed. The first trip of the car brought ashore...
Page 186 - In quantity, next after salt, come certain combinations of magnesia, next salts of lime, the carbonate held in solution by excess of carbonic acid, then small quantities of potash and oxide of iron, and lastly, a trace of a most remarkable elementary body — iodine.

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