Gleanings in Natural History: Second Series to which are Added Some Extracts from the Unpublished Mss. of the Late Mr. White of Selborne

Przednia okładka
J. Murray, 1834 - 321
 

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Popularne fragmenty

Strona 120 - Forthwith the sounds and seas, each creek and bay, With fry innumerable swarm, and shoals Of fish, that with their fins and shining scales Glide under the green wave, in sculls that oft Bank the mid sea...
Strona 199 - But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend, The first to welcome, foremost to defend, Whose honest heart is still his master's own, Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone...
Strona 294 - How delightful in the early spring, after the dull and tedious time of winter, when the frosts disappear and the sunshine warms the earth and waters, to wander forth by some clear stream...
Strona 130 - The morn is up again, the dewy morn, With breath all incense, and with cheek all bloom, Laughing the clouds away with playful scorn, And living as if earth contained no tomb, — And glowing into day...
Strona 111 - How airy and how light the graceful arch, Yet awful as the consecrated roof » Re-echoing pious anthems ! while beneath The chequer'd earth seems restless as a flood Brush'd by the wind. So sportive is the light Shot through the boughs, it dances as they dance, Shadow and sunshine intermingling quick, And darkening and enlightening, as the leaves Play wanton, every moment, every spot.
Strona 277 - Blest power of sunshine ! — genial Day, What balm, what life is in thy ray ! To feel thee is such real bliss, That had the world no joy but this, To sit in sunshine calm and sweet, — It were a world too exquisite For man to leave it for the gloom, The deep, cold shadow of the tomb.
Strona 76 - ... the loveliest forms of nature ; winter is unknown to him, and he leaves the green meadows of England in autumn, for the myrtle and orange groves of Italy, and for the palms of Africa : he has always objects of pursuit, and his success is secure. Even the beings selected for his prey are poetical, beautiful, and transient.
Strona 102 - The monarch oak, the patriarch of the trees, Shoots rising up, and spreads by slow degrees ; Three centuries he grows, and three he stays, Supreme in state, and in three more decays...
Strona 108 - There is an old tale goes, that Herne the hunter, Sometime a keeper here in Windsor forest, Doth all the winter time, at still midnight, Walk round about an oak, with great ragg'd horns ; And there he blasts the tree, and takes the cattle, And makes milch-kine yield blood, and shakes a chain In a most hideous and dreadful manner...
Strona 92 - Swallows certainly sleep all the winter. A number of them conglobulate together, by flying round and round, and then all in a heap throw themselves under water, and lie in the bed of a river.

Informacje bibliograficzne