Glenwood Springs resource management plan: record of decision

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The Bureau, 1983 - Nature - 60 pages
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Page 60 - take" means to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct. (15) The term "threatened species" means any species which is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range.
Page 53 - Primitive — Area is characterized by an essentially unmodified natural environment of fairly large size. Interaction between users is very low and evidence of other users is minimal. The area is managed to be essentially free from evidence of human-induced restrictions and controls. Motorized use within the area is not permitted.
Page 53 - ... isolation from the sights and sounds of man, to feel a part of the natural environment, to have a high degree of challenge and risk, and to use outdoor skills. Some opportunity for isolation from the sights and sounds of man, but not as important as for primitive opportunities. Opportunity to have high degree of interaction with the natural environment, to have moderate challenge and risk, and to use outdoor skills. Some opportunity for isolation from the sights and sounds of man, but not as...
Page 60 - Changes in any of the basic landscape elements (form, line, color, or texture) caused by a management activity should not be evident in the characteristic landscape. Class III. Changes in the basic elements, (form, line, color, texture) caused by a management activity may be evident in the characteristic landscape. However, the changes should remain subordinate to the visual strength of the existing character.
Page 60 - Change is needed. This class applies to areas where the naturalistic character has been disturbed to a point where rehabilitation is needed to bring it back into character with the surrounding countryside. This class would apply to areas identified in the scenery evaluation in which the quality class has been reduced because of unacceptable intrusions.
Page 60 - US mining laws and all laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the Wilderness Act or subsequent establishing legislation to the same extent they were applicable prior to the date the Wilderness was designated by Congress as a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System.
Page 54 - ... the high, but not extremely high (or moderate) probability of experiencing isolation from the sights and sounds of humans, independence, closeness to nature, tranquility, and self-reliance through the application of woodsman and outdoor skills in an environment that offers challenge and risk. (The opportunity to have a high degree of interaction with the natural environment.) Motorized use is not permitted.
Page 54 - ... evidences of the sights and sounds of man. Such evidences usually harmonize with the natural environment. Interaction between users may be low to moderate, but with evidence of other users prevalent. Resource modification and utilization practices are evident, but harmonize with the natural environment. Conventional motorized use is provided for in construction standards and design of facilities.
Page 56 - Tracts or combinations of tracts of public land or interests in land that are suitable for conveyance out of federal ownership under existing laws and regulations. Considerations a. Isolated and small land parcels. b. Difficult and expensive to manage (no access, cost benefit low) lands. c. Tracts not suitable for management by another federal department or agency. d. Tracts that would serve important public objectives that could not be achieved prudently and feasibly on land other than public land...
Page 54 - The recreation opportunity experience level provided would be characterized by the probability for experiencing affiliation with individuals and groups is prevalent, as is the convenience of sites and opportunities. These factors are generally more important than the setting.

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