Global Dimensions of Gender and Carework

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Stanford University Press, 2006 - Social Science - 400 pages
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Why are women such prominent workers in the global marketplace? Why do so many perform jobs that involve carework? What political forces have made these women key participants in globalization? What are the consequences for the women themselves, for their families, and for societies and international relations in general?

This book offers a provocative examination of globalization, examining the lives of the women at the center of these new global dynamics. Arguing that society is facing multiple crises of care, the authors develop a new framework for understanding the interplay of globalization, gender, and carework. In four original essays, they examine gender, race, and class inequality; migration, citizenship, and the politics of social control; the evolving meanings of motherhood; and new social definitions of carework and the personal transformation of careworkers. Excerpts from the classic works in the field as well as recent cutting-edge research studies support the examination of each of these growing global crises.

 

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Contents

PARTI GLOBALIZATION AND MULTIPLE
9
Global Cities and Survival Circuits
30
Immigrant Women Workers
39
Migrant Filipina Domestic Workers and
48
Multilateral Organizations and Early Child Care
75
Globalization Work Hours and the Care Deficit
86
TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION
101
Domestic Servants
118
Workers Children and
240
The Meanings of Latina
254
Maid or Madam? Filipina Migrant Workers and
266
Connecting Carework
277
PARTIV VALUING CAREWORK THROUGH
287
A Postindustrial Thought
305
WomanFriendly States and a Public Culture of Care
311
Invisible Civic Engagement
324

International Migration Domestic Work and Care
145
International Students
162
My Wings
176
MOTHERHOOD DOMESTIC WORK
195
The Invisible Heart
211
Employed Mothers in the
217
Doing the Dirty Work? The Global Politics
226
Womens
341
Womens Empowering Carework in PostSoviet
351
Central State Child Care Policies in PostAuthoritarian
362
Conclusion
369
Copyright Acknowledgments
379
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Mary K. Zimmerman is Professor of Sociology and Professor of Health Policy and Management at the University of Kansas. Jacquelyn S. Litt is Director of Women's and Gender Studies and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Christine E. Bose is Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Women's Studies Department at the University at Albany, State University of New York.

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