Global Health Governance: International Law and Public Health in a Divided World

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University of Toronto Press, 2005 - Law - 202 pages
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Globalization has immersed all of humanity in a single germ pool. There are no health sanctuaries in a globalizing world. InGlobal Health Governance, Obijiofor Aginam explores the relevance of international law in contemporary public health diplomacy. He focuses on the concept of mutual vulnerability to explore the globalization of disease, in what is paradoxically a global village and a divided world.

Drawing from a wide range of disciplines, Global Health Governance offers a holistic approach to global health governance involving a multiplicity of actors: nation-states, international organizations, civil society organizations, and private actors. Aginam articulates modest proposals under the rubric of communitarian globalism, a paradigm that strives to meet the ideals of 'law of humanity.' These proposals project a humane global health order where all of humanity is inexorably tied into a global compact and where the health of one nation-state rises and falls with the health of others.

International law—with its bold claims to universal protection of human rights and human dignity—is an indispensable governance tool for the reconstruction of damaged public health trust in the relations of nations and peoples.

 

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Contents

IV
12
V
23
VI
25
VII
27
VIII
28
IX
29
X
32
XI
43
XXIV
86
XXV
88
XXVI
90
XXVII
92
XXVIII
95
XXIX
98
XXX
102
XXXI
107

XII
44
XIII
46
XIV
47
XV
48
XVI
53
XVII
57
XVIII
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XIX
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XX
61
XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
70
XXXII
109
XXXIII
111
XXXIV
114
XXXV
119
XXXVI
123
XXXVII
124
XXXVIII
126
XXXIX
128
XL
131
XLI
183
XLII
199
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About the author (2005)

Obijiofor Aginam is an assistant professor in the Department of Law at Carleton University.

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