Global Institutions, Marginalization, and Development

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Psychology Press, 2005 - Law - 222 pages
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For more than a century and a half, the most powerful national governments have created institutions of multilateral governance that promise to make a more inclusive world, a world serving women, working people, the colonized, the 'backward', the destitute, and the despised.

This groundbreaking book is a study of that promise, and of the real impact of this world government. It discusses what systems global institutions have, and have not done to keep their promise, and examines whether the system will serve the world's least-advantaged, or marginalize them further.

This book focuses on whether it is the 'economists and political philosophers of the rich', or the social movements of the disadvantaged that are most likely to influence the world's lawmakers, and the processes by which they will complete the next generation of multilateral institutions.  

An innovative study, this book is important reading for anyone with an interest in international political economy, global governance, development and the politics of north-south relations.

 

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Contents

Institutions marginalization development
1
The issues
2
Peace research institutional economics Gramscian International Relations
8
World organizations and human needs
16
Basic physiological needs and related human rights
18
Fundamental social and psychological needs
21
Fundamental needs conflict management and conflict resolution
24
basic needs
27
Alternative assumptions
106
The core of the NIEO ideology
107
response to unanticipated problems
110
The Group of 77 and the democratization of international relations
111
Reiterating the foundation in response to an unanticipated opportunity
113
Alternative explanations of Third World demands and the discipline of International Relations
114
Freezing the NorthSouth bloc after the EastWest thaw
118
The NorthSouth historic bloc
121

modernization rebellion democracy
28
The dialectic of liberal internationalism
32
The liberal vision and conflicts it can obscure
37
Liberal learning and the critical tradition
43
Gramsci and world order
45
Accounting for the liberal trajectory
51
Social movements and liberal world orders
54
Pinocchios problem
55
The double movement
59
World order crises and openings to previously marginalized social forces
64
Lessons for todays egalitarian social movements
68
Lessons for my students
71
The promise of democratic functionalism
73
Mitranys early ambivalence toward functional government
74
The origins of organization theory
77
Mary Parker Folletts democratic functionalism
80
The functional approach and the resolution of fundamental conflicts
84
Structural conflicts and the limits of democratic functionalism
85
Womens marginalization liberal forgetting and the thwarting of the liberal project
88
International institutions decolonization and development
91
How world organizations became involved in development
95
The organizations impact
96
The 1970s crises of international institutions and of populist development
97
New development issues for international institutions
101
What the Third World wanted The meaning of the NIEO
103
Crises in the NorthSouth bloc
125
Reconstruction ahead
128
Global governance Poorly done and poorly understood
133
Ideas regimes global public agencies private authorities and social movements
136
How we ended up with the world polity we have
139
What is to be done?
143
Political consequences of the new inequality
147
Leadership and global governance for the Information Age
159
The context of current debates about reforming global governance
160
The environment and kindred problems
162
Intellectual leadership
166
Benefactors
168
Creating resources
169
Prospects for cosmopolitan democracy
172
To mingle meet and know Marginalization and the privileged
175
The unfinished business of building the next world order
176
The Liberal fundamentalist case
177
prudential reasons for concern
179
Beyond the prudential
182
a copper box for cars
186
Notes
189
References
192
Index
210
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About the author (2005)

Craig N. Murphy is Historian of the United Nations Development Programme while on leave from Wellesley College, where he is M. Margaret Ball Professor of International Relations.

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