Globalization, Development and the Mass Media

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SAGE, Nov 20, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 264 pages
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Globalization, Development and the Mass Media gives a comprehensive and critical account of the theoretical changes in communication studies from the early theories of development communication through to the contemporary critiques of globalization.

It examines two main currents of thought. Firstly, the ways in which the media can be used to effect change and development. It traces the evolution of thinking from attempts to spread 'modernity' by way of using the media through to alternative perspectives based on encouraging participation in development communication. Secondly, the elaboration of the theory of media imperialism, the criticisms that it provoked and its replacement as the dominant theory of international communication by globalization.

 

 

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Contents

CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
1 INTRODUCTION
1
2 COMMUNICATING MODERNITY
20
3 THE PASSING OF MODERNITY
38
4 VARIETIES OF PARTICIPATION
56
5 CULTURAL AND MEDIA IMPERIALISM
81
6 THE FAILURE OF THE IMPERIALISM PARADIGM
105
7 GLOBALIZATION AND THE MEDIA
126
8 THE LIMITS OF GLOBALIZATION
149
9 TOWARDS A NEW PARADIGM
189
REFERENCES
227
INDEX
253
Copyright

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Page 13 - I mean to suggest that some accepted examples of actual scientific practice — examples which include law, theory, application, and instrumentation together — provide models from which spring particular coherent traditions of scientific research.
Page 19 - The earliest definition of development was 'a type of social change in which new ideas are introduced into a social system in order to produce higher per capita incomes and levels of living through more modern production methods and improved social organization
Page 20 - Historically, modernization is the process of change towards those types of social, economic, and political systems that have developed in Western Europe and North America from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth and have then spread to other European countries and in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the South American, Asian and African continents (Eisenstadt, 1966, p.
Page 20 - What is involved in modernization is a "total" transformation of a traditional or pre-modern society into the types of technology and associated social organization that characterize the "advanced" economically prosperous, and relatively politically stable nations of the Western World.
Page 22 - Modernization at the individual level corresponds to development at the societal level. Modernization is the process by which individuals change from a traditional way of life to a more complex, technologically advanced and rapidly changing style of life

About the author (2007)

Colin Sparks is a professor at the Centre for Communication and Information Studies at the Univeristy of Westminster and Co-Editor of Media, Culture and Society.

Anna Reading is a lecturer at Southbank University and Assistant Editor of Media, Culture and Society.

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