Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness

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Duke University Press, 2006 - History - 407 pages
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Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas argue that a firm grasp of globalization requires an understanding of how race has constituted, and been constituted by, global transformations. Focusing attention on race as an analytic category, this state-of-the-art collection of essays explores the changing meanings of blackness in the context of globalization. It illuminates the connections between contemporary global processes of racialization and transnational circulations set in motion by imperialism and slavery; between popular culture and global conceptions of blackness; and between the work of anthropologists, policymakers, religious revivalists, and activists and the solidification and globalization of racial categories.

A number of the essays bring to light the formative but not unproblematic influence of African American identity on other populations within the black diaspora. Among these are an examination of the impact of “black America” on racial identity and politics in mid-twentieth-century Liverpool and an inquiry into the distinctive experiences of blacks in Canada. Contributors investigate concepts of race and space in early-twenty-first century Harlem, the experiences of trafficked Nigerian sex workers in Italy, and the persistence of race in the purportedly non-racial language of the “New South Africa.” They highlight how blackness is consumed and expressed in Cubantimba music, in West Indian adolescent girls' fascination with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and in the incorporation of American rap music into black London culture. Connecting race to ethnicity, gender, sexuality, nationality, and religion, these essays reveal how new class economies, ideologies of belonging, and constructions of social difference are emerging from ongoing global transformations.

Contributors. Robert L. Adams, Lee D. Baker, Jacqueline Nassy Brown, Tina M. Campt, Kamari Maxine Clarke, Raymond Codrington, Grant Farred, Kesha Fikes, Isar Godreau, Ariana Hernandez-Reguant, Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe, John L. Jackson Jr., Oneka LaBennett, Naomi Pabst, Lena Sawyer, Deborah A. Thomas

 

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Contents

DIASPORIC MOVEMENTS MISSIONS AND MODERNITIES
10
Missionary Positions LEE D BAKER
37
Vodu and the Modernization of the Dominican
55
Gendering Black America in Black Liverpool
73
Writing History Between the Lines
93
Black Geopolitics and Invisible Empires
112
Roots Tourism and the Institutionalization
133
Emigration and the Spatial Production of Difference from Cape Verde
154
Recasting Black Venus in the New African Diaspora
206
Race in Postapartheid South Africa
226
POPULAR BLACKNESSES AUTHENTICITY AND NEW MEASURES
249
Race Gender and Consumption
279
Rap Race and Class in London
299
Racialization Gender and the Negotiation of Power in Stockholms
316
Progress America and the Politics of Popular Culture
335
Bibliography
355

Blanqueamiento and the Celebration of Blackness
171
Gentrification Globalization and Georaciality
188
Contributors
391
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About the author (2006)

Kamari Maxine Clarke is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Yale University. She is the author of Mapping Yorb Networks: Power and Agency in the Making of Transnational Communities, also published by Duke University Press.

Deborah A. Thomas is Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. She is the author of Modern Blackness: Nationalism, Globalization, and the Politics of Culture in Jamaica, also published by Duke University Press.

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