God vs. the Gavel: Religion and the Rule of Law

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 17, 2007 - Law - 430 pages
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God vs. the Gavel challenges the pervasive assumption that all religious conduct deserves constitutional protection. While religious conduct provides many benefits to society, it is not always benign. The thesis of the book is that anyone who harms another person should be governed by the laws that govern everyone else - and truth be told, religion is capable of great harm.

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God vs. the gavel: religion and the rule of law

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The legal principle Primum non nocere ("First, do no harm") trumps concern for individual religious liberty, argues Hamilton (law, Yeshiva Univ.) in this book. Nave notions of the inherent goodness of ... Read full review

Contents

PART TWO THE HISTORY AND DOCTRINE BEHIND THE RULE THAT
201
The Decline of the Special Treatment of Religious Entities
238
The Path to the Public Good
273
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Marci A. Hamilton is a leading and internationally recognized constitutional expert specializing in church/state relations. She is a leading national expert on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and is involved in cutting edge First Amendment litigation, involving clergy abuse (on behalf of victims) and land use (Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act).

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