God vs. Gay?: The Religious Case for Equality

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Beacon Press, Oct 25, 2011 - Religion - 232 pages
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Does the Bible prohibit homosexuality? No, says Bible scholar and activist Jay Michaelson. But not only that: Michaelson also shows that the vast majority of our shared religious traditions support the full equality and dignity of LGBT people. In this accessible, passionate, and provocative book, Michaelson argues for equality, not despite religion but because of it.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bostonian71 - LibraryThing

A slim but passionate book designed to counter religious objections to same-sex equality. Michaelson is generally engaging, and couches his arguments in ways that are thoughtful and considerate of ... Read full review

God vs. Gay?: The Religious Case for Equality

User Review  - James F. DeRoche - Book Verdict

Those who oppose equal rights for LGBT people are often Christians who assert that the Bible is God's literal word and that several passages in it condemn homosexual activity. Even Christians who aren ... Read full review

Contents

A Note from the Series Editor
loving God could never want thecloset
By the word of God were the heavens made Sexual diversity is natural
Justicejustice shall you pursue Inequality is an affront to religious
Sodom Cruelty and inhospitality are the sins of Sodom
Romans Men not being dominant isa consequence of turning from
David and Jonathan Love between men in the Bible
You shall be holy for I am holy Equality for LGBT people is good
Everyone whose spirit moved him brought anoffering toGod Sexual
LGBT Religious Organizations
Bibliography
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Jay Michaelson is the author of three books and numerous articles about the intersections of religion, sexuality, and law. A leading activist on behalf of LGBT people in faith communities, Michaelson and his work have been featured in the New York Times and on NPR and CNN. He is the founder of Nehirim, the leading national provider of community programming for LGBT Jews and their allies, and lives in upstate New York. 


From the Hardcover edition.

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