Godefridus

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E. Lumley, 1844
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Side 273 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Side 237 - Horatio, what a wounded name, Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me ? If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart, Absent thee from felicity a while, And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain. To tell my story.
Side 167 - Cervantes smiled Spain's chivalry away; A single laugh demolish'd the right arm Of his own country; — seldom since that day Has Spain had heroes. While Romance could charm, The world gave ground before her bright array; And therefore have his volumes done such harm, That all their glory, as a composition, Was dearly purchased by his land's perdition. I'm "at my old lunes...
Side 86 - I gave him the book, and he read— " Chivalry is only a name for that general spirit or state of mind which disposes men to generous and heroic actions, and keeps them conversant with all that is beautiful and sublime in the intellectual and moral world.
Side 30 - The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, , The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite ; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, or any interest Unborrowed from the eye.
Side 141 - This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God...
Side 221 - The satirist may laugh, the philosopher may preach ; but Reason herself will respect the prejudices and habits which have been consecrated by the experience of mankind.
Side 15 - Hence in a season of calm weather Though inland far we be, Our Souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither, Can in a moment travel thither, And see the Children sport upon the shore, And hear the mighty waters rolling evermore.
Side 221 - ... the public esteem. If we read of some illustrious line so ancient that it has no beginning, so worthy that it ought to have no end, we sympathize in its various fortunes; nor can we blame the generous enthusiasm, or even the harmless vanity, of those who are allied to the honours of its name.
Side 115 - Ripples and glances on the confluent streams. A lovelier, purer light than that of day Rests on the hills, and oh ! how awfully, Into that deep and tranquil firmament, The summits of Auseva rise serene ! The watchman on the battlements partakes The stillness of the solemn hour ; he feels The silence of the earth ; the endless sound Of flowing water soothes him ; and the stars, Which in that brightest moonlight well nigh quench...

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