Goethe's Torquato Tasso

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D.C. Heath, 1891 - 181 pages
 

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Page 164 - With steed and ship their ravish'd spoils to seize, And for his theft the savage Turk requite) That they to thee should yield, in wisdom's right, The rule by land, or, if it have more charms, Of the high seas ; meanwhile, let it delight To hear our verse ring with divine alarms ; Rival of Godfrey, hear, and hearing, grasp thine...
Page 144 - ... youth, and the other forbidding him ; for the one is a lover of the body and hungers after beauty like ripe fruit, and would fain satisfy himself without any regard to the character of the beloved ; the other holds the desire of the body to be a secondary matter, and, looking rather than loving...
Page 148 - ... disorders recommenced. That these evils should thus become incurable, is attributable to a particular circumstance that must be related. Pope Gregory XIII., who is so frequently described as good-natured to excess, had yet asserted his ecclesiastical as well as secular rights with extremity of rigour,* and in doing this he regarded no man's interest or feelings. He spared neither the emperor nor the king of Spain, and to his more immediate neighbours he shewed as little deference. With Venice...
Page xxviii - As you will take everything to yourself that Tasso says, I have already written so much to you to-day that I can neither add anything to it nor improve upon it." On the following day: "I shall tell thee nothing of myself, nor of the morning. While writing at Tasso I have been directly worshipping thee.
Page v - I could hardly tell. I had the life of Tasso, and I had my own life, and putting together these two singular figures with their peculiarities, I obtained my Tasso. To him, by way of prosaic contrast, I opposed Antonio, for whom I also had models. As for the rest, the general situation* was the same in Weimar as in Ferrara; and I can truly say of my delineation, that it is bone of my bone and flesh of my flesh...
Page 149 - ... more distant relations. It is true that he did raise two of his nephews to the cardinalate (and Pius V. had done as much), but when a third, encouraged by their promotion, came to court with hope of equal fortune, he was refused an audience, and commanded to quit Rome within two days. The brother of Gregory had left his home, and was on the road to see and enjoy the honour that had visited his family, but arrived at Orvieto, he was met by a papal messenger, who desired him to return. Tears rose...
Page 156 - ... of Pindar, that a swarm of bees settled upon his lips, and fed him with honey, when he was left exposed upon the highway. It probably had some foundation in fact, whatever may be thought of the implied augury of the special favour of the gods which is said to have been drawn from it at the time. In any case, the picture of the strayed child, sleeping unconscious of its danger...
Page xvi - ... t Again he writes in his diary, in April, 1 780 : " I gain daily in insight and in aptitude for active life ; but I feel like a bird that has got entangled in a snare, I have wings, but cannot use them." t Being thus situated, it was but natural that Goethe, during his earlier years at Weimar, should often have his thoughts drawn to certain types of character that he saw more or less completely embodied in himself and in those with whom he came in contact : the Poet, the Prince and the Man of...
Page xviii - But here he found a woman who was socially above him, who knew much that he had yet to learn, who was capable of entering fully into all his best thoughts, and who, withal, seemed ready to help him with sympathy and counsel. So it was that almost from the...
Page xix - Stein was seven years older than Goethe, was the mother of several children, and at the time of her first acquaintance with the poet can hardly have attracted him by any physical charms.

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