Going Home: A Barnaby Skye Novel

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Macmillan, 2000 - Fiction - 315 pages
1 Review
Richard Wheeler's Barnaby Skye has been called the greatest creation in Western fiction since Max Brand's Destry. In Going Home, the year is 1832, six years after Skye deserted the Royal Navy, and now he has a chance to return to England to clear his name and take up employment with the Hudson's Bay Company. But "Mister Skye", as he insists on being called, is as much a magnet for trouble as he is a legend amoung mountain men, and this opportunity of a lifetime begins to disintegrate almost from the moment it is presented to him.

With his devoted wife Victoria and an eccentric botanist named Alistair Nutmeg, Skye makes his way west to Fort Vancouver to begin his journey home. But when the Hudson's Bay Ship Cadboro makes a stopover in Mexican California, Skye's luck -- generally bad to begin with -- runs out. Identified as a Navy deserter, he is forced to make a run for it into the wilderness, where he faces Mexican bandits, Indians, thirst, starvation, and despair -- and where he learns where home really is and what honor really means.

 

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GOING HOME

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Eleventh in the Western series featuring legendary mountain man Barnaby Skye, by the glorious Wheeler, who has published over 30 richly researched regional novels. As a westerner, Wheeler is a writer ... Read full review

Review: Going Home: A Barnaby Skye Novel

User Review  - Topher - Goodreads

Following the advice of my friend Chris, I've been giving westerns a try. This is a middle book in the 2nd series about Barnaby Skye (aka the Skye's West series), a press-ganged british sailor ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

one
9
two
15
three
21
four
27
five
33
six
40
seven
45
eight
52
twentyseven
170
twentyeight
176
twentynine
182
thirty
188
thirtyone
194
thirtytwo
200
thirtythree
206
thirtyfour
212

nine
59
ten
65
eleven
71
twelve
77
thirteen
84
fourteen
90
fifteen
96
sixteen
102
seventeen
108
eighteen
114
nineteen
120
twenty
126
twentyone
132
twentytwo
138
twentythree
145
twentyfour
152
twentyfive
158
twentysix
164
thirtyfive
218
thirtysix
224
thirtyseven
231
thirtyeight
237
thirtynine
243
forty
249
fortyone
255
fortytwo
261
fortythree
268
fortyfour
274
fortyfive
280
fortysix
286
fortyseven
292
fortyeight
297
fortynine
304
fifty
310
Authors Note
317
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Richard S. (Shaw) Wheeler was born in Milwaukee in 1935 and grew up in nearby Wauwatosa. Wheeler spent three years in Hollywood in the mid-50s, where he worked in a record store and took acting lessons while struggling as a screenwriter. He eventually returned home, and attended the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He spent over a decade as a newspaperman, working as an editorial writer for the Phoenix Gazette, editorial page editor for the Oakland, California, Tribune, reporter on the Nevada Appeal in Carson City, and reporter and assistant city editor for the Billings, Montana, Gazette. In 1972, he turned to book editing, working in all for four publishers through 1987. As an editor for Walker & Company he edited twelve Western novels a year. Sandwiched between editing stints, in the mid-70s he worked at the Rancho de la Osa dude ranch in Sasabe, Arizona, on the Mexican border. There, in the off season, he experimented with his own fiction and wrote his first novel, Bushwack, published by Doubleday in 1978. Five more Western novels followed Bushwack before Wheeler was able to turn to writing full time: Beneath the Blue Mountain (1979), Winter Grass (1983), Sam Hook (1986), Richard Lamb (1987) and Dodging Red Cloud (1987).

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