Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Front Cover
Broadway Books, 1999 - Religion - 200 pages
An intimate guide to self-acceptance and discovery that offers a Buddhist perspective on wholeness within the framework of a Western understanding of self.

For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego. We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime. But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way.

Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological. Happiness comes from letting go. Weaving together the accumulated wisdom of his two worlds--Buddhism and Western psychotherapy--Epstein shows how "the happiness that we seek depends on our ability to balance the ego's need to do with our inherent capacity to be." He encourages us to relax the ever-vigilant mind in order to experience the freedom that comes only from relinquishing control.

Drawing on events in his own life and stories from his patients, Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart teaches us that only by letting go can we start on the path to a more peaceful and spiritually satisfying life.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
3
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mildlydiverting - LibraryThing

Genuinely not sure what to make of this - it seems simultaneously very slight and incredibly profound. Good to be reminded that meditation/spiritual traditions are useful tools. Interesting synthesis ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ctoll - LibraryThing

Epstein combines the perspectives of psychological development as presented by D. W. Winnicott and the perspectives of Buddhism. I learned a lot. Read full review

Contents

part one LOOKING starting where you are l
3
surrender
29
part two SMILING finding a practice
49
connection
73
part three EMBRACING releasing your heart
93
relationship
117
part four ORGASM bringing it all back home
137
relief
159
Notes
183
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Mark Epstein, M.D., is a psychiatrist in private practice and the author of Thoughts Without a Thinker. He is a contributing editor to Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and clinical assistant professor of psychology at New York University. He lives in New York City.

Bibliographic information