Golden Tales of Anatole France

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Wildside Press LLC, Nov 1, 2007 - Fiction - 364 pages
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Included in this volume are "The Procurator of Judaea," "Putois," A Good Lesson Well Learnt," "The Seven Wives of Bluebeard," "Our Lady's Juggler," "Balthasar," Olivier's Brag," "The Ocean Christ," and many more.
 

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Contents

The Procurator of Judma
1
Putois
26
A Good Lesson Well Learnt
52
The Seven Wives of Bluebeard
62
Our Ladys Juggler
102
Balthasar
114
Oliviers Brag
138
The Ocean Christ
151
The Daughter of Lilith
173
Leslie Wood
194
Five Fair Ladies
211
Laeta Acilia
258
Edmee or Charity Well Bestowed
273
Mademoiselle de Doucines New Years Present
281
The Miracle of the Great St Nicolas
290
Gesta
341

The Manuscript of a Village Doctor
158

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About the author (2007)

Anatole France was the pen name of Jacques Anatole Francois Thibault, who was born in Paris in 1844. The son of a bookseller, Thibault had a lifelong interest in literature. He worked as a schoolteacher, as a reader and editor for publishing houses, and as an assistant librarian in Paris' Senate Library, in addition to writing fiction, plays, poetry, criticism, and autobiographical stories. In his lifetime, Thibault was considered one of France's most beloved authors, and he received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1921. France's first novel was The Famished Cat, published in 1879. France's best-known novels include Monsieur Bergeret in Paris, The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard, Member of the Institute (for which he received an award from the French Academy in 1881), At the Sign of the Reine Pedauque, Penguin Island, Thais (which became the basis for an opera), The Gods Are Athirst, and The Revolt of the Angels. During the late 1890s Thibault became very involved in political and social issues. He was especially committed to socialism and to the fight against anti-Semitism, mainly as a result of the Dreyfuss affair. This new awareness was reflected in his writing, particularly in books such as Penguin Island, which criticized contemporary French society, and The Revolt of the Angels, which parodied the Catholic Church. He also became the literary advisor to l'Humanitie, an influential socialist newspaper, and frequently contributed articles to it until, dissatisfied with the Communist party that had eventually evolved, he renounced all political ties to the left just before his death in 1924.

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