Gongora: An Historical & Critical Essay on the Times of Philip III. & IV. of Spain, Volume 1

Front Cover
John Murray, 1862 - Spain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

ministers
24
Baptism of the Prince Public ceremony Robbery of the childs trinkets
25
dinners
27
Masquerade and Ball
28
Historical Sacred and Allegorical Masques
29
Gongoras Sonnet and Stanzas from his Panegyric on the Peace with Great Britain
30
Pedro Franqueza and Rodrigo Calderon Gongoras promotion as honorary chaplain to the King
33
The Duke of Lerma 34
34
SBC PAGE 36 The loss to Spain may have been exaggerated but the injustice cannot be palliated or denied
36
Literary character of the period
37
Profuse expenditure of the Court
39
Mission of the Duke of Mayenne Provision for his tables and followers Gongoras Sonnet
40
Expulsion of the Moriscoes Archbishop Ribera
42
Causes and effects of the expulsion
44
Other countries must bear a part of the blame
45
among them?
47
Operations against the pirates in Barbary Larache and Mamora Gongoras Sonnets
50
Long continuance of the piratical states Renegades and outlaws find refuge there
51
Distinguished freebooters Danger of the Andalusian coast
54
Retrospect of the history of the redemption of captives 55
56
Ineffective attempts against the Algerines Gongoras lines in the Panegyric
57
English and French naval wars with Algiers
59
Late vengeance of England
60
Ransoms negotiated by the Friars
61
Prevalence of robbers State of Catalonia
62
Cervantes Public favour to rogues and vagabonds How to be accounted for
64
Lawlessness of the people University Students
66
StreetFrays often fatal
68
Privileged Classes The Duke of Macqueda
69
The Duchess of Najera
72
Thieves and bullies
74
Gambling in the higher ranks The Count of Gelves
75
The Duke of Lermas melancholy
76
Bullfights and Masques
77
The Duke at Ventosilla
79
SBC PAGE
80
sBC PAGE 81 Charities of Philip III
81
The Spanish nobility Loyalty Last days of
82
7a Inward voices or answers to prayer Asceticism
93
Archbishop Ribera and the Duke of Medina Celi
108
Duke of Alva 1n
112
The Count of Miranda
114
Character of Philip III Gongoras ode to his memory The Infanta Margarita 129
130
His learning and accomplishments and benevolence
133
His justice to the Arragonese Remarks on the history of Antonio Perez
137
The Inquisition in this reign Examination of Llorentes estimates
141
The Inquisition under Philip IV and Charles II 139141
142
Afterwards Portuguese
143
Estimate of the ordinary work of the Inquisition
145
Opinions of old Spaniards Father Navarrete
147
Gongora remains at Madrid The CountDuke School of Gongora
149
Different causes assigned for it
159
Mr Fords remarks corrected
173
I34 I35 More to the same purpose Lopes sonnets
194
Gongoras Polifemo defended Mr Ticknor
200
The estimate summed up Ramon Fernandez
208
PostscriptThe Portrait of Gongora by Velazquez
216
The Song of Lepanto
221
The Count of Fuentes
227
The Winning of Cales by Cervantes
233
Sonnets pags
242
Ode on the death of Philip III
250
On the death of Rodrigo Calderon
256
POEMS RELATING TO JUAN DE TASSIS
264
Nine Sonnets by Yillamediana 1 Say what is Beauty?
266
Faith
267
On the death of the Count of Comnna
268
Praise of the Duke of Lerma
269
Written in his banishment from court
270
Philip IV in council
271
Rhymes on the ministry of Olivares
273
Gongora on the death of Villamediana
274
POEMS ILLUSTRATING THE POETS PRIVATE HISTORY AND PERSONAL FRIENDSHIPS Sonnets 1 On his youthful sickness
275
To Don Geronymo Manrique bishop elect of Cordova
276
The poet and his patrons
277
On the censure pronounced against his Lonely Musings I
278
Polypheme and his critics
279
The poets troubles at Valladolid
280
The poets life at court
281
On his departure from court after the change of ministers in the year 1618
282
Louisa de Cardona
289
To Pedro de Angulo staying at Granada
297
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 186 - Let thy servant, I pray thee, turn back again, that I may die in mine own city, and be buried by the grave of my father and of my mother.
Page 199 - ... if the Poet's subject be judiciously chosen, it will naturally, and upon fit occasion, lead him to passions the language of which, if selected truly and judiciously, must necessarily be dignified and variegated, and alive with metaphors and figures.
Page 1 - draw out the thread of their verbosity finer than the staple of their 'argument.
Page 199 - the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all science"; and what is a countenance without its expression?
Page 206 - But the pen that thus immortalizes the heavenly turnkeys on the bronze of its history is not a pen, but the key of ages. It opens to their names, not the gates of failing memory, which stamps shadows on masses of foam, but the gates of immortality.
Page 206 - Y de la erudición después lamido, Historia es culta, cuyo encanecido Estilo, si no métrico, peinado. Tres ya pilotos del bajel sagrado Hurta al tiempo y redime del olvido. Pluma pues que claveros celestiales Eterniza en los bronces de su historia, Clave es ya de los siglos, y no pluma.
Page 230 - The luster of thy crown was first in song. Now the dull weeds that spring by Stygian pool Were fitting wreath for thee. Land of the rule Of Arthurs, Edwards, Henries! Where are they? Their mother where, rejoicing in their sway, Firm in the strength of Faith? To lasting shame Condemned, thou guilty blame Of her who rules thee now.
Page 111 - If there was a favourable side of religious society, there is also. something to be said for the old nobility. There were certainly among them men, who entitled themselves to the praise of the Son of Sirach, as "leaders of the people by their counsels;" and many more, who were "rich men furnished with ability, living peaceably in their habitations." Those who had been to Salamanca were usually good Latin scholars, and sometimes picked up a little Greek.* To easy composition in verse they sometimes...
Page 133 - Sunne that ever shineth, And spirit of that special! Grace, That Faith and Love defineth. It is the warrant of the Word, That yeeld's a sent so sweet, As gives a power to Faith, to tread All false-hood under feete.
Page 222 - Glory waits on thy returning, John of Austria, to the sound Of the cannon's voice, and clarions, Heard these sea-girt isles around, Where all fiery red with slaughter Breaks the bubbling foam and spray ; Smouldering spars and turbans floating Crowd each cove and inland bay. Victory speak each blazing...

Bibliographic information