"Good Gracious, Annabelle": A Romantic Farce Comedy in Three Acts

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S. French, 1922 - 106 pages
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Page 108 - Two settings necessary, a college boy's room and the university campus. Time, about 2 hours. Like many another college boy, "Bob" Selby, an all-round popular college man, becomes possessed of the idea that athletic prowess is more to be desired than scholarship. He is surprised in the midst of a "spread" in his room in Regatta week by a visit from his aunt who is putting him through college. Aunt Serena, "a lady of the old school and the dearest little woman in the whole world," has hastened to make...
Page 107 - Tempest and Sunshine." We can strongly recommend this play as one of the best plays for high school production published in recent years. Price, 30 Cents. (The Above Are Subject to Royalty When Produced) SAMUEL FRENCH, 28-30 West 38th Street, New York City New and Explicit Descriptive Catalogue Mailed Free on Request A comedy in four acts, by Marion Short.
Page 108 - Prom" and the classroom, makes a story of dramatic interest and brings out very clearly certain phases of modern college life. There are several opportunities for the introduction of college songs and "stunts.
Page 15 - I'm in — I mean what is in the envelope. Two shares of the greatest stock in the world, Titcomb. Will give me control of property worth millions. Some idiot borrowed seven hundred dollars on it and forgot to pay up. That's all it cost me. Good business, — eh? TITCOMB (impressed) — Very good, I should say, sir. WIMBLEDON— They think all I do is to spend money. But I'm making it all the time — just as though I needed it. That's the secret of success, Titcomb. TITCOMB — Yes, sir? WIMBLEDON...
Page 57 - ... Looking for the kitchen they come upon Annabelle, and this calls for explanations. RAWSON (to ANNABELLE after ALEC leaves) — You must know Mr. Wimbledon very well— to visit him when he's away? ANNABELLE — Yes, well — I think you see enough of people when you're not visiting them, don't you? And the best time to visit them is when they're away. Where are you stopping, Mr. Rawson? RAWSON — Why, I'm staying here. ANNABELLE — Here? Then you know Mr. Wimbledon? RAWSON — No, I don't....
Page 46 - ... see but you'll have to go down then, Maggie. This is Mrs. Jennings, Mr. Ludgate. I did think of her for parlor maid. Maybe she could do both — Mr. Jennings' wife and parlor-maid, too. JAMES — I see no objections, as long as she sleeps in the Lodge. GWENDOLEN (terrified) — Annabelle! JAMES — Wages, forty, Maggie. GWENDOLEN — But I couldn't sleep in the Lodge. JAMES — Why not? GWENDOLEN (boldly) — My husband snores — JENNINGS — I don't, as a matter of fact. ANNABELLE — I'm sure...
Page 46 - ... chauffeurs. You and I are considered of equal importance with the family, Mrs. Losslethorpe. ANNABELLE — I should think so. What good is the rest of the family if you kill the cook? (ETHEL interrupts.) That's all, Lizzie. ETHEL — I should hope so. (Exit ALFRED and ETHEL into Palm Room.) ANNABELLE — This is the gardener, Mr. Jennings — Alonzo Jennings. JAMES — Are you married, Mr. Jennings? JENNINGS — Married ? JAMES — Mr. Wimbledon likes to have the gardener's wife in the Lodge....
Page 102 - I suppose it means a law suit — perhaps a few years of litigation. WIMBLEDON (walking a few paces and turning) — Rawson — you're a good business man — what would you advise us to do? RAWSON — What I've always advised — what I tried to get your father to do — (After a pause.) Get together. WIMBLEDON — Be partners? RAWSON — Why not? You've only got to look at me — to know that I would keep your secrets as though they were my own. WIMBLEDON — I said that, didn't I? And the fight...
Page 17 - But you can all disappear into the Palm Room and order a beautiful cup — with champagne and apricots and everything very juicy and cold — and beautiful flowers— with ferns to make us think we're in the woods — and beautiful clams, to make us think we're at the seashore." The others have gone to order the lunch when Gosling comes. He is still irritated but Annabelle does not notice that. GOSLING — You were late as usual. Well, what's the trouble? ANNABELLE (lightly) — There isn't any....

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