Good in Every Thing: A Story

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D. Appleton & Company, 1865 - Children's stories - 188 pages
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Page 145 - It seemed a thrill of pleasure. The budding twigs spread out their fan, To catch the breezy air ; And I must think, do all I can, That there was pleasure there. If this belief from heaven be sent, If such be Nature's holy plan, Have I not reason to lament What man has made of man.
Page 60 - Down which she so often has tripp'd with her pail ; And a single small cottage, a nest like a dove's, The one only dwelling on earth that she loves. / She looks, and her heart is in heaven : but they fade, The mist and the river, the hill and the shade; The stream will not flow, and the hill will not rise, And the colours have all passed away from her eyes ! WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TELL me where is Fancy bred, Or in the heart or in the head?
Page 59 - THE REVERIE OF POOR SUSAN AT the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears, Hangs a Thrush that sings loud, it has sung for three years: Poor Susan has pass'd by the spot, and has heard In the silence of morning the song of the bird. 'Tis a note of enchantment; what ails her? She sees A mountain ascending, a vision of trees; Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside.
Page 191 - It does not seem so very hard to be obliged to work," said Gilbert; " Nancy is much happier than she used to be." " Much happier and much better," continued Mrs Duncan; "work or labour is a blessing — not a hardship." "But," said Gilbert, "when Adam and Eve were driven from Eden, it was declared that man should eat bread by the sweat of his brow, and this was a punishment." Mrs Duncan replied : " The disobedience of Adam and Eve called forth that sentence, and therefore it was a punishment; but...
Page 139 - Now the sun is in the west, Sinking slow behind the trees ; And the cuckoo, welcome guest, Gently woos the evening breeze...
Page 30 - When Gilbert was eating his supper, he examined his milk, and began to talk about the cows and the milking that he expected to see ; and the churning the butter, and feeding the pigs, and all the farm-house matters, of which he had so often heard from Esther ; and when he went to bed, it was some time before he dropped asleep, his head was so full of his anticipated visit. The weather next morning was very fine ; and when he looked at the sunshine and the sparrows, he no longer wished for wings....
Page 120 - But if we do learn the lesson," said Gregory, "we get some good out of evil." " Or what we call evil" added the gentleman : " to do evil is bad in itself, that we all know well enough ; but we don't know as much as we think we know about the evil, as we call it, which we ourselves do not bring about by our own ignorance or misconduct. I believe if we were less disposed to find fault and to grumble, and if we were to accept what God sends us, with the determination to make the best of it, and to try...
Page 176 - Both the sufferers and they that relieved them may humbly accept the words which Christ addressed to the multitude : ' Blessed are they that mourn ; for they shall be comforted. ' Blessed are the merciful ; for they shall obtain mercy.
Page 41 - A very poor woman stood looking into a carriage ; her eyes were red with crying ; and in the carriage was a younger woman with a little girl, who was sobbing and crying, and every now and then making a struggle as if she wanted to get out to the elder woman. At length Mrs. Duncan appeared on the platform, and they joined her. After the first greetings Mrs. Harland said, " Gilbert has been alarmed lest you should not arrive in time.
Page 188 - I think," replied Mrs. Duncan, "you need not fear that you will be required to leave them.". " And yet not go back to London I" exclaimed Gilbert. " That is not easy to understand, is it ? "Well, I will explain it to you. Your parents have long •wished to leave London, but their occupations prevented their doing so ; your father has just obtained a very good situation in a bank at Fairburn, which, you know, is only a few miles from Wishton.

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