Good Stories for Great Holidays: Arranged for Story-telling and Reading Aloud and for the Children's Own Reading

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Frances Jenkins Olcott
Houghton Mifflin, 1914 - Children's literature - 461 pages
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u suck man

Contents

I
3
II
25
III
39
IV
57
V
69
VI
87
VII
119
VIII
135
X
177
XI
211
XII
231
XIII
267
XIV
297
XV
363
XVI
387
Copyright

IX
157

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Page 229 - Columbus, then rising, drew his sword, displayed the royal standard, and assembling around him the two captains and the rest who had landed, he took solemn possession in the name of the Castilian sovereigns, giving the island the name of San Salvador.
Page 269 - pleasante citie," writes their historian Bradford, "which had been ther resting place near 12 years, but they knew they were pilgrimes & looked not much on those things, but lift up their eyes to y e Heavens their dearest cuntrie, and quieted their spirits.
Page 382 - the trysting-hour—now gone by! Without a word he turned and rushed forth madly through the city and the gate, over the fields into the wood. Spent of breath he reached the tree, and, listening fearfully, he heard once more the low voice murmur: — "Rhoecus!" But as he looked he could see nothing but the deepening glooms beneath the oak. Then the voice sighed:
Page 323 - I wonder if the sparrows will beat against the window-panes! I wonder if I shall take root here, and stand dressed so winter and summer!" Aye, aye, much he knew about the matter! but he had a real back-ache for sheer longing, and a back-ache with trees is the same thing as a headache with us.
Page 173 - The commandant appeared at the door halfdressed, the frightened face of his pretty wife peering over his shoulder. He gazed at Allen in bewildered astonishment. "By whose authority do you act?" exclaimed he. "In the name of the Continental Congress!" replied Allen, with a flourish of his sword, and an oath which we do not care to subjoin.
Page 273 - Thou hast put gladness in my heart, more than in the time that their corn and their wine increased.
Page 140 - O say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming, Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so gallantly streaming? And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there. O say, does the star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of
Page 373 - in a moment, perhaps, but in months and years, — but canst thou tell the difference betwixt a minute, a month, or a year in the eyes of Him with whom one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day?
Page 160 - It bore the portentous text from Scripture: "Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land, unto all the inhabitants thereof." A joyous peal from that bell gave notice that the bill had been passed. It was the knell of British domination. THE SIGNING OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE BY HA
Page 161 - no pulling different ways. We must all hang together." "Yes," said Franklin, quaintly: "we must all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang separately." We are told that Charles Carroll, thinking that his writing looked shaky, added the words, "of Carrollton," so that the king should not be able to make any mistake as to whose name stood there. A BRAVE GIRL BY JAMES JOHONNOT

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