Google, Amazon, and Beyond: Creating and Consuming Web Services

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Apress, Jan 1, 2008 - Computers - 352 pages
What Is This Book About? This is a book about Web Services. Web Services are still more like a movement than a mature technology. The movement is motivated by a vision of a semi-auto mated Web that can support long chains of interactions between autonomous agents. There are three important components to that vision. One is interoperabil ity: a service can have clients (agents) from any platform, in any language. Another is autonomy: an agent can discover the services it needs from their published descriptions that include both what the service can do and how it does it (the interfaces of available actions). The third is (semi) automatic code creation: one description can be used by a development framework to automate the creation of code for clients and by the services themselves. As of today, interoperability is close to full realization, with only occasional glitches; autonomy is a distant vision; but it still has problems. Interoperability has been achieved code creation is useful in part by using an XML-based high-level protocol (SOAP) for message exchanges between clients and services. As long as the client can produce messages in the right format, it doesn't matter what language they're written in or on what platform they run. The first three chapters of our book show how to write platform-independent Web Services clients in Javascript and Java running from within a browser (IE6 or Mozilla).
 

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Contents

Defining Web Services
1
The JavaScript Code and the Google API
13
Conclusion
24
D0M and SOAP
25
The Anatomy of a SOAP Message
33
Encoding and RPC Conventions
41
Conclusion
64
Java Applet
67
Conclusion
189
Tomcat JSP and WebDAV
191
SOAPXslt jsp
199
WebDAV in General and in Tomcat
209
Conclusion e e
222
WebDAV Client to Database via XML
223
New XPath and XSLT
230
The Code of hierdiv xsl e e
240

A Java Version of a SOAP Client
84
Conclusion
97
DBService and a Book Club
99
Sockets and Ports
105
Processing HTTP Request
111
Driver Database Connection and Statement
117
Database Access in DBService
125
Authentication and REST
131
The REST Version
152
Conclusion
160
Restructuring Results with XSLT
161
XSLT for Amazon Data
177
Combining Data Sources in XSLT
183
DBFilter java
248
Conclusion
258
WSDL and Axis
259
An Overview of WSDL
272
DocumentLiteral WSDL
278
Creating WSDL for DBAuthService
290
Conclusion
303
Appendix A Installation
305
Appendix B Troubleshooting
309
Online Resources
311
Index
315
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Alexander Nakhimovsky received a master's degree in mathematics from Leningrad University in St. Petersburgand a Ph.D. in linguistics from Cornell University, with a graduate minor in computer science. He has been teaching computer science at Colgate University since 1985. He is the author (jointly with Tom Myers) of several books and book chapters, including JavaScript Objects, Professional Java XML Programming, and Professional Java Server Programming, J2EE Edition, as well as books and articles on linguistics and artificial intelligence.

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