Gothic Vision: Three Centuries of Horror, Terror and Fear

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A&C Black, Aug 27, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 230 pages
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The Gothic Vision examines a broad range of tales of horror, terror, the uncanny and the supernatural, spanning the late-eighteenth century to the present, and of related theoretical approaches to the realm of dark writing. It argues that such narratives are objects for historical analysis, due to their implication in specific ideologies, while also focusing on the recurrence over time of themes of physical and psychological disintegration, spectrality and monstrosity. This is an excellent overview of a genre that is increasingly studied in literature, film, and cultural studies courses.
 

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Contents

Dark Places
27
Dark Times
38
Dark Psyches
48
Haunting
59
Introduction
61
The Rhetoric of Haunting
65
Spectral Forms
75
Haunting Settings
85
Introduction
135
Families
141
The Abandoned Child
150
Childhood and Otherness
160
Monstrosity
169
Introduction
171
Vampires
179
Hybrid and Grotesque Bodies
190

Narrative and the Self
95
Introduction
97
Words and Visions
103
Textual Identities
113
Storytelling as Therapy
123
Child and Adult
133
The Abject
199
Epilogue
207
References
215
Index
229
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Page 3 - Terror and horror are so far opposite, that the first expands the soul, and awakens the faculties to a high degree of life; the other contracts, freezes, and nearly annihilates them. I apprehend, that neither Shakespeare nor Milton by their fictions, nor Mr. Burke by his reasoning, anywhere looked to positive horror as a source of the sublime, though they all agree that terror is a very high one...
Page 26 - We stand upon the brink of a precipice. We peer into the abyss— we grow sick and dizzy. Our first impulse is to shrink from the danger. Unaccountably we remain.
Page 5 - ... forms unseen, and mightier 28A far than we',8 our imagination, darting forth, explores with rapture the new world which is laid open to its view, and rejoices in the expansion of its powers.

References to this book

Gothic Literature
Andrew Smith
No preview available - 2007
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About the author (2002)

Dani Cavallaro is a freelance writer specializing in literary studies, critical and cultural theory and the visual arts. Her publications include The Gothic Vision, Critical and Cultural Theory and Cyberpunk and Cyberculture.

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