Graham's American Monthly Magazine of Literature, Art, and Fashion, Volume 42

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G.R. Graham., 1853
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Page 138 - And when they came to Marah, they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter : therefore the name of it was called Marah.
Page 99 - They are foul anomalies, of whom we know not whence they are sprung, nor whether they have beginning or ending. As they are without human passions, so they seem to be without human relations. They come with thunder and lightning, and vanish to airy music. This is all we know of them. Except Hecate, they have no names, which heightens their mysteriousness.
Page 98 - Invest me in my motley ; give me leave To speak my mind, and I will through and through Cleanse the foul body of the infected world, If they will patiently receive my medicine.
Page 191 - Silent till some replying warder blew His alien horn and then was heard no more. Where erst the jay, within the elm's tall crest, Made garrulous trouble round her...
Page 6 - The ass, he said, he was assured, loved him ; and, upon this, told them a long story of a mischance upon their passage over the Pyrenean Mountains, which had separated them from each other three days ; during which time the ass had sought him as much as he had sought the ass ; and that they had scarce either eat or drank till they met. Thou hast one comfort, friend, said I, at least, in the loss of thy poor beast, I'm sure thou hast been a merciful master to him.
Page 6 - He then took his crust of bread out of his wallet again, as if to eat it, held it some time in his hand, — then laid it upon the bit of his ass's bridle, — looked wistfully at the little arrangement he had made, — and then gave a sigh.
Page 191 - O'er the dun waters widening in the vales, Sent down the air a greeting to the mills, On the dull thunder of alternate flails.
Page 228 - My lords, quoth the bride, my father's so base, He is loth with his presence these states to disgrace.
Page 101 - Our chief, whom England and all Europe, saving only the Frenchmen, worshipped almost, had this of the godlike in him, that he was impassible before victory, before danger, before defeat Before the greatest obstacle or the most trivial ceremony; before a hundred thousand men drawn in battalia, or a peasant slaughtered at the door of his burning hovel ; before a carouse of drunken German lords, or a monarch's court, or a cottage table where his plans were laid, or an enemy's battery vomiting flame...
Page 358 - There is an empire exempt from all natural causes of decay. Those triumphs are the pacific triumphs of reason over barbarism ; that empire is the imperishable empire of our arts and our morals, our literature and our laws.

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