Grammar to Go: The Portable A-Zed Guide to Canadian Usage

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House of Anansi, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 213 pages
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This convenient, portable guide provides straightforward solutions to the most common problems of Canadian English grammar and usage. Fully revised and expanded, this new edition of Rob Colter's bestseller contains four sections: Grammar and Style, Punctuation, Spelling, and Common Confusions. Within each section the entries are alphabetically arranged for easy reference. This is not a grammar book in the conventional sense of that dreaded word: grammar knowledge is not needed to find answers, and the wealth of explanations and examples make it easy to understand and use once they're found. If, for example, you want to know (once and for all) the difference between "it's" and "its," you don't need to know the relevant parts of speech. Simply look under the heading "It's/Its." This edition adds sections on source documentation, email, inclusive language, parallelism, ambiguity, and language simplification. The result is an indispensable grammar guide that belongs in every backpack, briefcase, or handbag.
 

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Contents

Being
8
Double Negatives
21
Hopefully
28
LessFewer
41
Negative Prefixes
55
Possessive Case Bosss
71
SimileMetaphor
82
WhoWhom
97
AstronomerAstrologer
146
CallusCallous
149
DesertDessert
162
DisinterestedUninterested
164
IeEi
178
In Camera
179
Once in a While
192
PassedPast
194

Colon
110
Quoting
123
SPELLING AND COMMON CONFUSIONS
133
Thank you
207
TwoToToo
208
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Rob Colter has taught writing courses at the Toronto Board of Education, Algonquin College, York University, and Humber College, and for ten years was a language-training consultant in business and industry. His writing workshop at Ryerson University has attracted students from all walks of life for more than twenty-five years. He is currently a professor at Seneca College, Toronto.

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