Grand Central: How a Train Station Transformed America

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Grand Central Publishing, Jan 22, 2013 - Transportation - 288 pages
3 Reviews
A rich, illustrated - and entertaining -- history of the iconic Grand Central Terminal, from one of New York City's favorite writers, just in time to celebrate the train station's 100th fabulous anniversary.

In the winter of 1913, Grand Central Station was officially opened and immediately became one of the most beautiful and recognizable Manhattan landmarks. In this celebration of the one hundred year old terminal, Sam Roberts of The New York Times looks back at Grand Central's conception, amazing history, and the far-reaching cultural effects of the station that continues to amaze tourists and shuttle busy commuters.

Along the way, Roberts will explore how the Manhattan transit hub truly foreshadowed the evolution of suburban expansion in the country, and fostered the nation's westward expansion and growth via the railroad.

Featuring quirky anecdotes and behind-the-scenes information, this book will allow readers to peek into the secret and unseen areas of Grand Central -- from the tunnels, to the command center, to the hidden passageways.

With stories about everything from the famous movies that have used Grand Central as a location to the celestial ceiling in the main lobby (including its stunning mistake) to the homeless denizens who reside in the building's catacombs, this is a fascinating and, exciting look at a true American institution.

 

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This book has a lot of misinformation and stuff that's just plain false including the tall tale about how FDR supposed to be used platform on track 61 which has been proven false.

Review: Grand Central: How a Train Station Transformed America

User Review  - Ken Ellis - Goodreads

Having visited NYC for the first time last December, I've become fascinated with the city's history. One of my favorite stops was Grand Central Terminal, and I had to learn more about that magnificent ... Read full review

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About the author (2013)

Sam Roberts is a New York Times reporter and host of NY-1's cable talk show New York Close-Up. He lives in Manhattan with his family.

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y. to Irish immigrant parents in 1935, Pete Hamill attended Mexico City College, Pratt Institute, and The School of Visual Arts before starting a career in journalism. In 1960, Hamill accepted an entry-level job at the New York Post, becoming a columnist five years later. Hamill subsequently worked as a columnist for the New York Daily News and the Village Voice. Later working as a contributing editor at Esquire, Hamill has written articles for the New York Times magazine, Conde Nast Traveler, Vanity Fair, and Playboy magazine, among others. He is also an accomplished novelist, having written more than a dozen books, including his national best-selling memoir, A Drinking Life, and the novels Snow in August; Why Sinatra Matters; and Lost Cities, Vanished Friends.

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