Great American Lawyers: The Lives and Influence of Judges and Lawyers who Have Acquired Permanent National Reputation, and Have Developed the Jurisprudence of the United States; a History of the Legal Profession in America, Ed. by William Draper Lewis, Volume 6

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William Draper Lewis
John C. Winston Company, 1909 - Judges
 

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Page 578 - No man in this country is so high that he is above the law. No officer of the law may set that law at defiance with impunity. All the officers of the Government, from the highest to the lowest, are creatures of the law, and are bound to obey it.
Page 541 - A sturdy lad from New Hampshire or Vermont, who in turn tries all the professions, who teams it, farms it, peddles, keeps a school, preaches, edits a newspaper, goes to Congress, buys a township, and so forth, in successive years, and always like a cat falls on his feet, is worth a hundred of these city dolls. He walks abreast with his days and feels no shame in not 'studying a profession/ for he does not postpone his life, but lives already.
Page 575 - To lay with one hand the power of the government on the property of the citizen, and with the other to bestow it upon favored individuals to aid private enterprises and build up private fortunes, is none the less a robberv because it is done under the forms of law and is called taxation.
Page 367 - The laws of the United States are laws in the several states, and just as much binding on the citizens and courts thereof as the state laws are. The United States is not a foreign sovereignty as regards the several states, but is a concurrent, and, within its jurisdiction, paramount sovereignty.
Page 513 - It is the eternal struggle between these two principles, right and wrong, throughout the world. They are the two principles that have stood face to face from the beginning of time, and will ever continue to struggle. The one is the common right of humanity; and the other, the divine right of kings. It is the same principle in whatever shape it develops itself. It is the same spirit that says, ' You work and toil and earn bread, and I'll eat it.
Page 385 - It does not' invest Congress with power to legislate upon subjects which are within the domain of State legislation ; but to provide modes of relief against State legislation, or State action, of the kind re_ ferred to.
Page 396 - It has frequently been laid down by this court that the power of Congress over interstate commerce is as absolute as it is over foreign commerce.
Page 517 - It is a sad task to discuss questions so fearful as civil war; but sad as it is, bloody and disastrous as I expect it will be, I express it as my conviction before God, that it is the duty of every American citizen to rally round the flag of his country.
Page 363 - I dissent from the opinion of the court in this case, because it seems to me that the general government has the same power of taxing the income of officers of the State governments as it has of taxing that of its own officers. It is the common government of all alike; and every citizen is presumed to trust his own government in the matter of taxation. No man ceases to be a citizen of the United States by being an officer under the State government. I cannot accede to the doctrine that the general...
Page 433 - We do not see how a better test can be applied to the question whether reasonable or not than by considering whether the restraint is such only as to afford a fair protection to the interests of the party in favor of whom it is given, and not so large as to interfere with the interests of the public.

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