The Great Divorce: A Dream

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HarperCollins, 2002 - Christian fiction - 109 pages
60 Reviews
In The Great Divorce C.S. Lewis again employs his formidable talent for fable and allegory. The writer, in a dream, boards a bus on a drizzly afternoon and embarks on an incredible voyage through Heaven and Hell. He meets a host of supernatural beings far removed from his expectations and comes to significant realizations about the ultimate consequences of everyday behavior. This is the starting point for a profound meditation upon good and evil: "If we insist on keeping Hell (or even earth) we shall not see Heaven: if we accept Heaven we shall not be able to retain even the smallest and most intimate souvenirs of Hell."

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bezoar44 - LibraryThing

C.S. Lewis is a fine propagandist - more that in this short novel than an apologist. But the power of his allegory - in this, in the Screwtape Letters, in the Narnia Chronicles, in the Out of the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tjsjohanna - LibraryThing

In this slim allegorical tale, Mr. Lewis illustrates the idea that "no unclean thing can enter the kingdom of God" in a very concrete way. Over and over we see "ghosts" who are bid to enter heaven but ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. His major contributions in literary criticism, children's literature, fantasy literature and popular theology brought him international renown and acclaim. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year.

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