Great Powers and Outlaw States: Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal Order

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 22, 2004 - Law - 391 pages
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The presence of Great Powers and outlaw states is a central but under-explored feature of international society. In this book, Gerry Simpson describes the ways in which an international legal order based on 'sovereign equality' has accommodated the Great Powers and regulated outlaw states since the beginning of the nineteenth-century. In doing so, the author offers a fresh understanding of sovereignty which he terms juridical sovereignty to show how international law has managed the interplay of three languages: the languages of Great Power prerogative, the language of outlawry (or anti-pluralism) and the language of sovereign equality. The co-existence and interaction of these three languages is traced through a number of moments of institutional transformation in the global order from the Congress of Vienna to the 'war on terrorism'.
 

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Contents

Great Powers and outlaw states
3
Concepts
23
Sovereign equalities
25
Legalised hierarchies
62
Histories Great Powers
89
Legalised hegemony from Congress to Conference 18151906
91
Extreme equality Rupture at the Second Hague Peace Conference 1907
132
The Great Powers sovereign equality and the making of the United Nations Charter San Francisco 1945
165
Unequal sovereigns 18151839
227
Peaceloving nations 1945
254
Outlaw states 1999
278
Conclusion
317
Arguing about Afghanistan Great Powers and outlaw states redux
319
The puzzle of sovereignty
352
Select bibliography
354
Index
372

Holy Alliances Verona 1822 and Kosovo 1999
194
Histories Outlaw States
225

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About the author (2004)

Gerry Simpson is a Senior Lecturer in the Law Department at the London School of Economics where he teaches Public International Law and International Criminal Law. He has been a Legal Adviser to the Australian Government on international criminal law and was part of the Australian delegation at the Rome Conference in 1998 to establish an international criminal court. He has also worked for several non-governmental organisations and appears regularly in the media discussing the law of war crimes and the law on the use of force in international law. Previous publications include The Law of War Crimes (1997) with Tim McCormack and The Nature of International Law (2001).

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