Great Smoky Mountains National Park: Ridge Runner Rescue

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Rowman & Littlefield, Mar 20, 2012 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 96 pages
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 This is Max Davis reporting from the Great Smoky Mountains. It’s the summer of 1940 . . .

 

The Parkers, an intrepid family of four, are back for another exciting adventure, this time at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. With their great-grandfather’s journal as their guide, ten-year-old twins James and Morgan and their parents backpack twenty-six miles along the Appalachian Trail, spotting synchronized fireflies and North America’s largest salamander species. But will the adventure end when Morgan comes down with a mysterious illness?

Each book in the exciting Adventures with the Parkers series for kids 8–13 explores a popular national park and is packed with adventure as well as engaging and educational facts about nature, outdoor safety, and much more. Vacation has never been this fun!
 
Books in the Adventures with the Parkers Series:


Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks: Danger in the Narrows
Glacier National Park: Going to the Sun
Grand Canyon National Park: Tail of the Scorpion
Great Smoky Mountains National Park: Ridge Runner Rescue
Mount Rushmore, Badlands, Wind Cave: Going Underground
Olympic National Park: Touch of the Tide Pool, Crack of the Glacier
Rocky Mountain National Park: Peril on Longs Peak
Yellowstone National Park: Eye of the Grizzly
Yosemite National Park: Harrowing Ascent of Half Dome

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - klmontgomery - LibraryThing

This is a very informative book on the Great Smoky Mountains. Although it would probably be boring to read aloud to children, it could easily be divided into parts to teach a lesson. The material in it could be used in different subjects such as Science and Social Studies. Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Mike Graf has shared his writing and national park experiences with children and teachers in hundreds of schools. He has penned more than 70 books for children. A national park fanatic, Graf visits about twenty-five national parks across the country every year. 

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